AN ATTIC RED-FIGURED COLUMN-KRATER
AN ATTIC RED-FIGURED COLUMN-KRATER
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AN ATTIC RED-FIGURED COLUMN-KRATER

ATTRIBUTED TO THE LENINGRAD PAINTER, CIRCA 470-460 B.C.

Details
AN ATTIC RED-FIGURED COLUMN-KRATER
ATTRIBUTED TO THE LENINGRAD PAINTER, CIRCA 470-460 B.C.
16 7⁄8 in. (43 cm.) high
Provenance
with Galerie Günter Puhze, Freiburg, 1987 (Kunst der Antike, vol. 7, no. 191).
Dr. Manfred Zimmermann (1935-2011), Bremen, Germany, acquired by 1996; thence by descent to the current owner.
Literature
M. Steinhart, Töpferkunst und Meisterzeichnung: Attische Wein- und Ölgefässe aus der Sammlung Zimmermann, Mainz, 1996, pp. 119-121, no. 26, pl. 19.
F. Hildebrandt, Antike Bilderwelten: Was griechische Vasen erzählen, Darmstadt, 2017, pp. 47-48, fig. 41; p. 147, no. 50.
Beazley Archive Pottery Database no. 19085.
Exhibited
Bremen, Antikenmuseum im Schnoor, 2005-2018.
Hamburg, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, 2018-2023.

Brought to you by

Hannah Fox Solomon
Hannah Fox Solomon Head of Department, Specialist

Lot Essay

The Leningrad Painter, who takes his name from an amphora in the State Hermitage Museum, was considered by J.D. Beazley to be an “Early Mannerist,” a pupil of the great vase-painter Myson and one who, at the time of radical change in artistic expression with the emergence of a new Classical style, chose to adhere to the previous Archaic tradition. According to J. Boardman (p. 179 in Athenian Red Figure Vases: The Archaic Period), Mannerists show a commitment to slimmer figures with smaller heads, an exploitation of pattern in dress for decorative sake, and a triviality of subject, rendered “with a touch of the theatrical (in the modern sense).”

On the obverse, Poseidon runs to the right in pursuit of two women. The god wears a chiton, with a chlamys draped over his left arm, and holds his trident in his right hand. Both women, clad in a chiton and a chlamys, flee to the right, but the sincerity of their resistance is undermined by the fact that both turn back to meet Poseidon’s gaze and lift the folds of their garments at the shoulders, a gesture that recalls anakalypsis, in which a bride signals her acceptance of and submission to her husband. The woman at the center of this three-figure scene may be Amymone, the daughter of King Danaos of Argos, but the identification is not certain in the absence of her characteristic hydria. For related pursuit scenes see pp. 352-359 in E.D. Reeder, Pandora, Women in Classical Greece.

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