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A BOSNIAN SWORD
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A BOSNIAN SWORD

CENTRAL BALKANS, CIRCA 1800

Details
A BOSNIAN SWORD
CENTRAL BALKANS, CIRCA 1800
The double-edged blade with central ridge and slightly curved tip, the silver hilt with repoussé decoration of cresent moon and star motifs with palmettes, curved quillons and pommel with stylised animal head, the tip of pommel with inset coral bead, the associated sheath with pierced floral decoration with punched texture on gilt ground, rounded engraved chape, reverse with engraved scrolling floral decoration with applied silver belt fitting
29½in. (74.8cm.) long (2)
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

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Andrew Butler-Wheelhouse

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Lot Essay

A very similar sword is in the Furusiyya Art Foundation Collection (Bashir Mohamed, The Arts of the Muslim Knight, Milan, 2007, no.42, p.78). The blade here is of typical form, completely straight and symmetrical save for the very small curved section taken out at the tip. The makara head terminals are also typical. The workmanship on the sheath is very comparable to that produced in Istanbul. This is not surprising since there was a very strong tradition of silversmithing in Bosnia linked to the Ottoman capital in Istanbul; many of the silversmiths in 16th century Istanbul were of Bosnian origin (Marian Wenzel, 'Early Ottoman Silver and Iznik Pottery Design', Apollo, September 1989, p.160).

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