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A CHINESE-EXPORT BLACK AND GILT-LACQUER TRAY-ON-STAND
VAT rate of 17.5% is payable on hammer price and b… Read more
A CHINESE-EXPORT BLACK AND GILT-LACQUER TRAY-ON-STAND

THE TRAY LATE 18TH CENTURY, THE ENGLISH STAND 20TH CENTURY

Details
A CHINESE-EXPORT BLACK AND GILT-LACQUER TRAY-ON-STAND
The tray late 18th Century, the English stand 20th Century
The rectangular tray with a concave-moulded gallery decorated with floral trellis borders and with a Chinese landscape scene of palaces in a lakeland setting, the stand with foliate-decorated ring-turned tapering legs joined by conforming stretchers, on splayed feet
21¾ in. (55 cm.) high; 31¼ in. (79.5 cm.) wide; 20½ in. (52 cm.) deep
Special Notice

VAT rate of 17.5% is payable on hammer price and buyer's premium when purchased by non-EU purchasers.

Lot Essay

Following the introduction of tea in the latter part of the 17th Century, japanned and lacquer trays became popular for the tea equipage and indeed were originally known as 'Tea Tables'. Early in George I's reign 'Four India tea boards' are recorded in the inventory of the Duke of Montagu's furniture at Boughton. Later in the 18th Century, Sir Alexander Boswell, writing about social habits in Edinburgh, refers to 'The Indian Tray, with Indian china graced'. A related black and gold-japanned tray, decorated with the arms of the Tower family of Weald Hall, is illustrated in P. Macquoid and R. Edwards, The Dictionary of English Furniture, London, rev. ed., 1954, vol. III, p. 347, fig. 3.
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