Upcoming Auctions and Events

COVID-19 Important notice Read More
A CORONATION FAVOUR FOR THE CORONATION OF GEORGE III
A CORONATION FAVOUR FOR THE CORONATION OF GEORGE III

1761

Details
A CORONATION FAVOUR FOR THE CORONATION OF GEORGE III 1761 A white silk ribbon corsage woven in coloured silks and metal threads with a crown and the monogram 'GCR', framed with its original bill of purchase, printed and with additional writing in black ink: 'Mrs Lucas, London, Sep. 17 1761, Bought of William Garsed...' 11 x 4.5 in. (28 x 37 cm.)
Provenance
Mrs Lucas, purchased from William Garsted, Ludgate Hill, London, 1761.
Literature
S. Houfe, Sir Albert Richardson, The Professor, Luton, 1980, p. 131.

Brought to you by

Alexandra Cruden
Alexandra Cruden Auction Administrator

Lot Essay

The tradition of wearing coronation favours in hats or on bodices, dates from the late 17th century at least. At the 1827 Coronation of George II, a royal decree ordered that 'no Person whatever, who shall be present at the said Coronation (either attending the Proceeding, or as Spectator) do appear in Mourning Habit on that Day, and the wearing Coronation Favours will be approved of', and in 1809, during the Jubilee celebrations of George III, an elderly lady from Penzance was noted as wearing the same coronation favour that she wore on the day of the King's coronation in 1761.
William Garsed (fl. 1751-75) of Ludgate Hill, London is listed in The Universal Director; or, the Nobleman and Gentleman's True Guide to the Masters and Professors of the Liberal and Polite Arts and Sciences; and of the Mechanic Arts, Manufactures, and Trades, Established in London and Westminster and their Environs, 1763, as a haberdasher, and purveyor of household wares.

More From The Collection of Professor Sir Albert Richardson, P.R.A.

View All
View All