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A CREAM PAINTED PLASTER CAST FIGURE OF THE VENUS DE MILO

Christie’s charges a premium to the buyer on the Hammer Price of each lot sold at the following rates: 29.75% of the Hammer Price of each lot up to and including €20,000, plus 23.8% of the Hammer Price between €20,001 and €800.000, plus 14.28% of any amount in excess of €800.000. Buyer’s premium is calculated on the basis of each lot individually.
A CREAM PAINTED PLASTER CAST FIGURE OF THE VENUS DE MILO

AFTER THE ANTIQUE, PROBABLY FRENCH, LAST QUARTER 19TH OR FIRST QUARTER 20TH CENTURY

Details
A CREAM PAINTED PLASTER CAST FIGURE OF THE VENUS DE MILO AFTER THE ANTIQUE, PROBABLY FRENCH, LAST QUARTER 19TH OR FIRST QUARTER 20TH CENTURY On a wooden square plinth base 216 cm. high; 252 cm. high overall
Special Notice

Christie’s charges a premium to the buyer on the Hammer Price of each lot sold at the following rates: 29.75% of the Hammer Price of each lot up to and including €20,000, plus 23.8% of the Hammer Price between €20,001 and €800.000, plus 14.28% of any amount in excess of €800.000. Buyer’s premium is calculated on the basis of each lot individually.

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Sabine Dalmeijer
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Lot Essay

Venus De Milo, also known as Aphrodite of Melos, is a replica of the original statue that currently resides in the Louvre in Paris. Originally sculpted in approximately 130 B.C., it was rediscovered in 1820 on the Aegean island of Melos.

In the early and mid nineteenth century Classical art was the height of scholastic and cultural fashion. These were the days before cheap, easy travel and quality photography, so plaster casts such as the present lot were one of the standard tools for studying Classical art history. When a new piece of Greek or Roman sculpture was discovered, museums all over Europe would obtain plaster casts of it. In the 1950s and '60s many collections all over Europe were broken up - literally - as casts fell out of fashion; today, plaster collections such as the one in the Ashmolean Museum are rare, and valued once again.

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