A DUTCH FAMILY COLLECTION OF 17TH-18TH CENTURY WORKS FORMED THROUGH MARRIAGE AND DESCENT INCLUDING THE VAN HOORN, VAN WASSENAER AND VAN PALLANDT FAMILIES
A DUTCH FAMILY COLLECTION OF 17TH-18TH CENTURY WORKS FORMED THROUGH MARRIAGE AND DESCENT INCLUDING THE VAN HOORN, VAN WASSENAER AND VAN PALLANDT FAMILIES
A DUTCH FAMILY COLLECTION OF 17TH-18TH CENTURY WORKS FORMED THROUGH MARRIAGE AND DESCENT INCLUDING THE VAN HOORN, VAN WASSENAER AND VAN PALLANDT FAMILIES
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A NOBLE DUTCH FAMILY COLLECTION OF 17TH-18TH CENTURY WORKS FORMED THROUGH MARRIAGE AND DESCENT INCLUDING THE VAN HOORN, VAN WASSENAER AND VAN PALLANDT FAMILIES
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Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more PROPERTY OF AN ARISTOCRATIC DUTCH FAMILY
A DUTCH FAMILY COLLECTION OF 17TH-18TH CENTURY WORKS FORMED THROUGH MARRIAGE AND DESCENT INCLUDING THE VAN HOORN, VAN WASSENAER AND VAN PALLANDT FAMILIES

17TH - 18TH CENTURY

Details
A DUTCH FAMILY COLLECTION OF 17TH-18TH CENTURY WORKS FORMED THROUGH MARRIAGE AND DESCENT INCLUDING THE VAN HOORN, VAN WASSENAER AND VAN PALLANDT FAMILIES
17TH - 18TH CENTURY
a) A Japanese lacquer accessory box (tebako) decorated with the coat-of-arms of Joan van Hoorn, Edo period, circa 1700-1710, the box octagonal, with cover decorated in various lacquer techniques including gold and silver high and low relief lacquer (takamaki-e and hiramaki-e), togidashi, sprinkled gold flecks (nashiji), kinpun and kirikane all against a black roiro-nuri ground, the sides depicting a lady and attendant, pavilions beside a bridge over water, birds amongst various flowers and trees issuing from rockwork, the base and interior in dense nashiji, fundame rims, 5 1/8 in. (13.1 cm.) wide, 3 in. (7.5 cm.) high

b) A Japanese Arita porcelain apothecary bottle, Edo period, circa 1690-1710, decorated in underglaze blue with the initials I:V:H (Joan van Hoorn) within a laurel wreath surrounded by flowering peony and pomegranate branches, the neck with a double flanged rim decorated with flower sprays above a lappet band, 9 ½ in. (24 cm.) high

c) A Japanese Arita porcelain ewer, Edo period, circa 1660-80, the pear-shaped body with waisted neck and loop handle, decorated in underglaze blue with a continuous landscape with figures in Chinese transitional style, the handle decorated with geometric design and pierced for a mount, 8 ¼ in. (21 cm.) high

d) A Dutch-colonial silvered and cased table watch with alarm, signed Noel Pol, Batavia (Jakarta, Indonesia), dated 1694, the silver dial with Roman enamel hours, steel hand and inner Arabic alarm dial with trefoil hand, the movement with brass plates joined by vase-shaped pillars, pierced steel gate, chain fuse for time and spring barrel for striking, pierced and engraved alarm barrel, the fine spring balance with engraved backcock to verge escapement, the backplate with worm and wheel set-up and engraved Noel Pol / Batavia 1694, the casing decorated with a putto amongst scrolling foliage, double chain with a ring with copper key; together with a fitted wood with richly decorated silver lock plates and hinges, 5 3/8 in. (13.6 cm.) long, 4 in. (10.2 cm.) wide, 1 ¾ in. (4.5 cm.) high, the case inlaid with a silver plate with a verse reading:

De tijd valt deenen cort en dander langh
En onder wijlen gaet de tijd altijt haer gangh
Wel hem die desen tijt geaerden soo beleeft
Dat hij niet voor het eijnd van sijnen tijt en beeft

For some time seems short and for others long
and all the while time just goes on
Hail to him who lives his time well-grounded
so that he may live his life without fear

e) A silver filigree box and cover, Batavia (Jakarta, Indonesia), circa 1700, with an outer wall of silver filigree in the form of leaves and flowers, encasing a silver-gilt liner, 2 5/8 in. (7 cm.) diam., 1 ½ in. (3.8 cm.) high

f) An iron and gold betel nut-cutter, Mainland Southeast Asia, circa 1690, with dragon head and elaborate chased and engraved scrollwork, 6 3/8 in. (16.1 cm.) long

g) A black leather and silver-mounted notebook, circa 1700, with silver fittings finely engraved with a ship flying a VOC flag, silver clasps engraved with ‘VOC’ and ‘R’, of the Rotterdam Chamber of the VOC, parchment paper pages within, silver writing implement, 5 ¼ in. (13.5 cm.) long and 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) wide

h) A serpentine tankard, Dutch or German, 17th century, with silver mounts, handle and cover, the cover engraved with the coat-of-arms of the van Wassenaer family within a ring of leaves, 6 1/8 in. (15.9 cm.) high

i) A serpentine decagonal canister, Dutch or German, dated 1638, with silver screw cover engraved with a garland and the coat-of-arms of Margaretha van Aeswijn, Widow of Munster, Lady of Runen (circa 1590-1657) the side of the cover inscribed M*V*A*W*V*M*V*V*R and ALLEEN*GOODT*DIE*EER*ANNO*1638, 7 1/3 in. (18.7 cm.) high

j) A circular serpentine box, probably German, 17th century, the box with screw cover and ring, 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) diam., 3 7/8 in. (10 cm.) high

k) A horn and silver cup, Dutch or German, 17th century, mounted with silver foot, rim and handles in the form of stylised mythical bird heads, 5 ½ in. (14 cm.) wide, 3 ½ in. (9 cm.) high, including silver fittings

l) A small Japanese lacquer incense cabinet (kodansu), Edo period, circa 1700, the rectangular cabinet with hinged door opening to reveal six drawers; decorated overall with gold, silver, mother-of-pearl and coral inlays and in various lacquer techniques including gold and silver high and low relief lacquer (takamaki-e, hiramaki-e) and kirikane over a dense nashiji ground with gold flakes, the top panel with pine, bamboo and plum and birds, the door with birds perched in a plum tree issuing from rockwork, one side with peony and Chinese bellflower (kikyo), the other side with chrysanthemum and kikyo, the back panel with cherry and hyacinths, the interior of the door and drawers with further flowers, top drawer with an inner tray depicting a tiger beneath peony, the large middle drawer containing four small compartments, interiors in nashiji, silver fittings with chrysanthemums, 5 5/8 in. (14.4 cm.) deep, 3 ¼ in. (8.3 cm.) wide, 4 in. (10.2 cm.) high

m) A pair of Japanese Imari bottle porcelain vases, Edo period (late 17th-early 18th century), each of pear form with tall neck, decorated in underglaze blue, and overglaze iron-red, green, yellow, light blue, aubergine and black enamels and gilt with three panels depicting chrysanthemums, peony, pine, bamboo and plum issuing from rockwork, lappets of stylised leaves to the neck and foot, scrolling foliage (karakusa) around the rim, 9 ¼ in. (27.4 cm.) high each
Provenance
a) Willem van Outhoorn, Governor General of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) (1690-1704) or Joan van Hoorn, Governor General of the Dutch East India Company (1704-1709); thence by descent to the present owner
b) Joan van Hoorn, VOC (1704-1709); his daughter Petronella Wilhelmina van Hoorn married to Jan Trip den Jonge, who later married Baron Torck; thence by descent to the present owner
c) Willem van Outhoorn, VOC (1690-1704) or Joan van Hoorn, VOC (1704-1709); thence by descent to the present owner
d) Joan van Hoorn, VOC (1704-1709); his daughter Petronella Wilhelmina van Hoorn married to Jan Trip den Jonge, who later married Baron Torck; thence by descent to the present owner
e) Petronella Wilhelmina van Hoorn (1698-1764); thence by descent to the present owner
f) Willem van Outhoorn (1690-1704) or Joan van Hoorn, VOC (1704-1709); thence by descent to the present owner
h) Probably made for Arent van Wassenaer, Lord of Duvenvoirde (1610-1681), or his son Jacob (1649-1707). Then owned by the wife of Frederick Willem Torck (1691-1761), and later inherited by the van Pallandt family; thence by descent to the present owner
i) Margaretha van Aeswijn, Widow of Munster, Lady of Runen (circa 1590-1657); her cousin Eustatius heer van Wezenhorst (d. 1633); then his son Anthonis (1615-1647) who married Margaretha Torck (1622-1674); then to the van Pallandts (details from J. Bijelveld, Leiden, letter dated 14-05-1937); thence by descent to the present owner
m) Willem van Outhoorn (1690-1704) or Joan van Hoorn VOC (1704-1709); thence by descent to the present owner
Literature
a) Oliver Impey and Christian Jorg, Japanese Export Lacquer 15801850, (Amsterdam, 2005), p. 39, fig. 23
a) Peabody Essex Museum and Rijksmuseum eds., Asia in Amsterdam The culture of luxury in the Golden Age, (Amsterdam/Salem, 2015), cat. 19b
d) Bea Brommer, To My Dear Pieternelletje: Grandfather and Granddaughter in VOC Time, 1710-1720, (Netherlands, 2015), p. 181, fig. 158
e) Peabody Essex Museum and Rijksmuseum eds., Asia in Amsterdam The culture of luxury in the Golden Age, (Amsterdam/Salem, 2015), cat. 20
e) Bea Brommer, To My Dear Pieternelletje: Grandfather and Granddaughter in VOC Time, 1710-1720, (Netherlands, 2015), p. 95, fig. 87
f) Peabody Essex Museum and Rijksmuseum eds., Asia in Amsterdam The culture of luxury in the Golden Age, (Amsterdam/Salem, 2015), fig. 7
f) Bea Brommer, To My Dear Pieternelletje: Grandfather and Granddaughter in VOC Time, 1710-1720, (Netherlands, 2015), p. 65, fig. 56
l) Bea Brommer, To My Dear Pieternelletje: Grandfather and Granddaughter in VOC Time, 1710-1720, (Netherlands, 2015), p. 95, fig. 85
Exhibited
Since circa 1969: formerly on loan to the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.
Special notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

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Katharine Cooke
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Lot Essay

The Dutch East India Company (VOC) was founded in 1602 when six major trading companies amalgamated. Within the new company these became known as “Chambers” – Amsterdam and Zeeland, Delft, Rotterdam, Hoorn and Enkhuizen. The headquarters were in Amsterdam, however in 1619 the VOC decided to establish its centre of government and administration in Jakarta on the north coast of Java, which they named Batavia. This required the appointment of a governor-general who alongside appointed members of the Council of the East Indies, supervised the management of the Company in Asia. Willem van Outhoorn (1691-1704) and his son-in-law Joan van Hoorn (1653-1711) were successive governors-general of the VOC in Batavia in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Having settled in Batavia with his parents in 1663, Joan van Hoorn married Willem van Outhoorn’s daughter Susanna in 1693, with whom he had a daughter, Petronella van Hoorn (1698-1764). Eventually having left his post as governor-general in 1709, Joan van Hoorn returned to Amsterdam in 1710 with Petronella, a year before he died in 1711.

Men from prominent families with power and wealth such as Willem van Outhoorn and Joan van Hoorn used their access to exotic goods from Asia to accumulate luxuries and artworks as a display of status. Alongside the purchase of non-personalised articles such as the betel nut cutters in this lot, objects decorated with family coats-of-arms were privately commissioned – a fashion which existed from around the mid-17th century up to the early 18th century. Japanese lacquer seems to have been a popular choice for decoration in this manner, such as the octagonal box offered here. This box has been decorated around the sides with a Japanese traditional-style decoration of ladies in a landscape with plum trees and distant mountains in a manner seen on lacquer produced for domestic Japanese use, however the cover of the box prominently displays the van Hoorn coat-of-arms. In fact, further examples of such lacquerwork were recorded in the possessions of Willem van Outhoorn, Joan van Hoorn and Petronella van Hoorn, such as a lacquer dish now in the Rijksmuseum bearing the crowned symmetrical monogram of Joan van Hoorn and Susanna van Outhoorn (object number BK-1990-9, go to: http:/hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.308407), and a lacquer dish with the van Outhoorn arms in the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem (inv. AE 85682).1 Interestingly, two further lacquer dishes bearing the arms of Joan van Hoorn were later incorporated into a Dutch commode attributed to Matthijs Horrix, The Hague, circa 1780-95.2

Fine lacquer objects would have been ordered from the Dutch trading post on the Deshima peninsula in Japan, where Willem’s brother, Cornelis van Outhoorn (1635-1708), served three terms as head. Japanese lacquer was one of the trade items that had interested the Dutch since the beginning of the VOC’s trade with Japan with the first shipment arriving in Holland in 1610. However Japanese lacquer was expensive and in Asia, the VOC gave luxury lacquered objects as gifts to the Persian court, the Sultan of Johore and the Queen of Cambodia.3

Following the death of her first husband, Petronella van Hoorn remarried Lubbert Adolf Tork in 1722, who in 1721 had inherited Rosendael Castle near Arnhem. Petronella, who acquired the silver filigree circular box and cover in this lot, had formed a collection of filigree, which is described in the catalogue of contents of Rosendael Castle as well as her home in Amsterdam on the Herengracht.4

The small lacquer incense cabinet in this collection is of a style produced for the domestic Japanese market. Small boxes such as this were highly prized in Europe with their rich, exotic decoration of finely-cut and inlaid pieces of gold, silver, coral and mother-of-pearl. A small tiered box of similar style is in the collection of Burghley House (inv. 9017).5 Oliver Impey suggested that the small group of domestic blue and white dishes and lacquer in Burghley were probably purchased in Japan by an employee of the VOC and brought to Burghley in the 17th century.

As well as lacquer, ceramics became an important embellishment in decorative schemes for grand houses across Europe as exemplified by Queen Mary II and William III at Het Loo in Holland and Kensington Palace in London in the 17th century. In the 1640s China was at civil war, leading to the fall of the Ming Dynasty and the accession of the Ching. As a result of this, one of the areas badly affected was Jingdezhen and its porcelain production decreased dramatically. The VOC looked to Japan to supply this deficit. Porcelain from Japan is first recorded as being ordered by the Dutch in 1653 and sent to Holland in 1657. It is well documented that the Dutch desired pieces in the manner of the export Chinese patterns, based on the Kraak and transitional styles that they had been accustomed to ordering from Jingdezhen. Initially the export from Japan consisted mainly of blue and white porcelain in the form of shaving bowls, bottles, vases, tankards and jugs. The forms were derived directly from European models or Chinese transitional wares. The Arita blue and white ewer offered here is decorated in the Chinese transitional style with Japanese stylisation, and is of a form influenced by Frankfurt faience. The apothecary bottle in this group is modelled on the dark glass bottles that were used for storing port or wine in Europe. These bottles are generally called apothecary bottles because the Dutch East India Company purchased them for domestic use in hospitals and apothecary shops in Batavia, however, there were special orders some with monograms such as VOC, and as here, that of Joan van Hoorn, Governor General of the VOC. There is another example also with the monogram of van Hoorn in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (2002.447.38).6

Also included in this group are three serpentine objects which have been inherited through the van Wassenaer and van Pallandt families. Originally hardstones such as serpentine were believed to possess miraculous powers to protect against poison. Serpentine was mined in northern Germany and the tankard, canister and circular box in this lot may have been made there.7 The arms on the cover of the tankard are those of the van Wassenaer family. For another example in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (M.31-1953), go to: http:/collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O91597/tankard-unknown/

1 Illustrated in Oliver Impey and Christian Jorg, Japanese Export Lacquer 1580-1850, (Amsterdam, 2005), p.39
2 Illustrated, Ibid, p. 297
3 Ibid., p. 28
4 Karina H. Corrigan, Jan van Campen, Femke Diercks, Janet C. Blyberg eds., Asia in Amsterdam, The Culture of Luxury in the Golden Age, (New Haven and London,
2015), p. 98
5 Op. cit., Impey & Jorg, p. 305, the box illustrated p. 306
6 Go to: http:/www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/49292?sortBy=Relevance&ft=apothecary+bottle+with+initials+ivh&ofset=0&rpp=20&pos=1
7 For further information on turned serpentine works, see Jutta Kappel, ‘Turned Serpentine Works’, in: Princely Splendor: The Dresden Court 1580-1620, Dirk Syndram and Antje Scherner, eds. (Milan / Dresden, 2004)

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