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A Fine and Important Lacquer Suzuribako [Writing Box] with Rocks and Waves
A Fine and Important Lacquer Suzuribako [Writing Box] with Rocks and Waves
A Fine and Important Lacquer Suzuribako [Writing Box] with Rocks and Waves
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more A Writing Box formerly in the Collection of Matsunaga Yasuzaemon (Jian) (1875-1971)
A Fine and Important Lacquer Suzuribako [Writing Box] with Rocks and Waves

ATTRIBUTED TO IGARASHI DOHO I (1643-1678), EDO PERIOD (MID-17TH CENTURY)

Details
A Fine and Important Lacquer Suzuribako [Writing Box] with Rocks and Waves
Attributed to Igarashi Doho I (1643-1678), Edo period (mid-17th century)
The rectangular box with overhanging cover finely decorated in various lacquer techniques including gold and silver hiramaki-e, takamaki-e, rich kirikane and kinpun, and inlaid with nuggets of solid gold and silver as well as cut pieces of mother-of-pearl, with a large and elegantly-formed rock covered in leaves against a rich gyobu-nashiji ground, the interior similarly decorated with rocks amidst crashing waves beneath a cloudy sky, fundame rims, a square copper water dropper inlaid with a chrysanthemum, a slate inkstone inset into a removable inner tray, with fitted double wood storage boxes, the outer box signed by the leading industrialist and collector Matsunaga Jian, Jian kyujugo [Jian, aged 95] and with kakihan
25.6 x 23.6 x 4.5 cm.
Provenance
Matsunaga Yasuzaemon (Jian) (1875-1971)
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Anastasia von Seibold
Anastasia von Seibold

Lot Essay

The first Igarashi Doho moved, together with his adopted son Doho II, and pupil, Shimizu Kyubei, from Kyoto, his native city, to Kanazawa in Kaga at the behest of Maeda Toshitsune, daimyo of the province in around 1700. Doho was the son of Igarashi Hosai and a descendant of Shinsai (c.1407-90), the founder of the school. Igarashi Doho developed a unique combination of black lacquer coating with extensive use of gold and silver leaf, flecks, and even nuggets of gold and silver. The elegance of this type of lacquerware appealed to the aristocratic nature of the Samurai culture. After the fame of Igarashi lacquer was established in Kanazawa (it became known in as Kaga-maki-e), Doho returned to Kyoto, where he died in 1678. Neither of the first two Doho masters signed their work.

For two further suzuribako by Doho I see Tokyo National Museum, Special Exhibition Oriental Lacquer Arts (Tokyo, 1977), no. 301 and 302. For a lacquer cabinet fitted for a poem book also by Doho I which contains a writing box similarly decorated with waves in the Ishikawa Prefectural Museum of Art, go to:
http://www.ishibi.pref.ishikawa.jp/collection/index.php?app=shiryo=detail_id=2552

Matsunaga Yasuzaemon (Jian) (1875-1971) was a prominent industrialist who helped build the infrastructure of postwar Japan. He formed an important collection of tea ceremony utensils, a portion of which he gifted to the Tokyo National Museum in 1947. He became a tea master and following his death in 1970s his collection was donated to the Fukuoka Art Museum.

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