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A FINE WILLIAM III PLAIN CIRCULAR MONTEITH, on moulded spreading foot, the detachable rim with reeded notched rim and applied with pendant hare-bells at intervals, engraved with a coat-of-arms within foliate scroll mantling the rim with a crest, 1696, makers's mark IW, a barrel or mallet below, probably for Joseph Ward

Details
A FINE WILLIAM III PLAIN CIRCULAR MONTEITH, on moulded spreading foot, the detachable rim with reeded notched rim and applied with pendant hare-bells at intervals, engraved with a coat-of-arms within foliate scroll mantling the rim with a crest, 1696, makers's mark IW, a barrel or mallet below, probably for Joseph Ward
11½in. (29cm.) diam.
(61ozs.)

The arms are those of Harvey impaling Robinson for John Harvey M.P. of Ickwell Bury (b.1677) and his wife Sarah, daughter and co-heir of Sir John Robinson Bart. of Farming Woods, Northamptonshire

Lot Essay

Although a small number of earlier Monteiths exist, 1684 is generally taken as the year that the form and use became fashionable. The name derives from an exccentric 'Monsieur Monteigh' who wore a cloak with an unusually designed notched hem. The plain bowl served as a vessel for the newly fashionable punch whereas the scalloped edge was used for suspending glasses to cool in iced water. The Monteith would be placed in the centre of the table so that glasses could be easily removed when required and replaced after use in order to remain cool and clean. In 1690, when punch clubs were competing to create the best punch, monteith production was at its zenith, but after about 1725 its popularity waned and few examples were therefore made

The maker's mark on this monteith, IW with a barrel of mallet below can be attributed with some certainty to Joseph Ward. Apprenticed to Joseph Slicer in 1672 and made free in 1689, he consequently would have been producing articles before his first known mark was registered in 1697 on the commencement of the register. A review of all goldsimths whose surname begin with W, recorded by Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697-1837, 1982, show very few whose first name began with the initial I, or more likely J. Joseph Ward is indeed the only largeworker recorded with these two initials working at that time

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