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A FINELY DETAILED AND WELL-PRESENTED SCALE MODEL OF THE LATE 19TH-CENTURY RUSSIAN BATTLESHIP ADMIRAL USHAKOV (1893)
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A FINELY DETAILED AND WELL-PRESENTED SCALE MODEL OF THE LATE 19TH-CENTURY RUSSIAN BATTLESHIP ADMIRAL USHAKOV (1893)

Details
A FINELY DETAILED AND WELL-PRESENTED SCALE MODEL OF THE LATE 19TH-CENTURY RUSSIAN BATTLESHIP ADMIRAL USHAKOV (1893)
modelled from his own researches by John Biggins, with masts, rigging, anchors with chain, davits and winches, companionways, main and secondary armament, deck rails, superstructure with glazed wheelhouse with helm and binnacle and helm and telegraph over, gun turret with ten guns and arc light over, two stayed funnels with safety valve extension pipes, ten assorted ship's boats in davits and chocks with internal details including bottom boards, thwarts and oars, and steam boilers with folded funnels, ventilators, engine room lights and other details. The hull with planked decks, carved crest, torpedo tubes, portholes, sponson booms, bilge keels, boarding companionways, twin shafts with three-blade propellers and rudder, is finished in red below the waterline, black and natural wood and mounted on two turned wooden columns to display board attached to green-painted base with metal-bound glazed cover. Measurements overall -- 21¼ x 42½in. (54 x 108cm.) See illustration
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis
This lot is subject to Collection and Storage charges

Lot Essay

Launched at St. Petersburg's New Admiralty yard in 1893 and commissioned two years later, the Admiral Ushakov was one of three coastal battleships built specifically to counter the ships of the Swedish Svea class. She displaced approximately 5,000 tons, measured 286½ feet in length and was armed with four 10-inch guns in twin turrets, four 4.7-inch guns in casemates, four surface torpedo tubes, as well as smaller guns. Her early career was relatively quiet, and not being designed for ocean cruising, she was left behind as Admiral Rodzdzhestvensky's Second Pacific squadron set off half way round the world to Port Arthur. In 1905 when the Russians and Japanese were at war Port Arthur fell and Russia's remaining battleships in the Far East were either scuttled or captured in the harbour. Every available ship was sent for, thus the Admiral Ushakov and her sisters set off as the centre of the Third Pacific Squadron. After meeting up with Rodzdzhestvensky's squadron, the fleet set off for its fateful rendezvous with Admiral Togo in the Straits of Tsushima. She was hit by three shells but was able to bring the flooding under control, however she lost speed and was then separated from the rest of the fleet. As the remaining ships surrendered, Admiral Ushakov attempted to escape but was spotted. She fought for an hour but sank with her colours flying as her crew abandoned ship. The Japanese picked up 363 survivors from her crew of 414.
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