A FRENCH ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD FAUTEUIL DE BUREAU
A FRENCH ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD FAUTEUIL DE BUREAU
A FRENCH ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD FAUTEUIL DE BUREAU
2 More
A FRENCH ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD FAUTEUIL DE BUREAU
5 More
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
A FRENCH ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD FAUTEUIL DE BUREAU

BY FRANÇOIS LINKE, INDEX NUMBER 703, PARIS, CIRCA 1900

Details
A FRENCH ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD FAUTEUIL DE BUREAU
BY FRANÇOIS LINKE, INDEX NUMBER 703, PARIS, CIRCA 1900
The cartouche-shaped back with rocaille-pedimented top rail centred by a female mask wreathed in ribbon-tied oak leaf garlands supported to the reverse by a scallop shell, above a padded back and seat upholstered in dark tan leather, the open arms with padded rests and dolphin supports, above a shaped seat-rail centred by a pierced acanthus cartouche with by a hibiscus bud spilling water, the cabriole legs headed by leafed scalloped shells spilling water running to foliate out-scrolled sabots, the proper right arm terminal signed 'F. Linke'
40 ½ in. (103 cm.) high; 27 ¼ in. (69 cm.) wide; 25 in. (58 cm.) deep
Provenance
Probably originally bought by Solomon Barnato Joel (1865-1931), 2 Great Stanhope Street, Mayfair,
London, Great Britain, or by Antonio Devoto, Palacio Devoto, Calle San Martin, Buenos Aires, Argentina
and sold El Regio Mobiliario de la sucesion de la Senore Condesa Elina Pombo de Devoto, J. C. Naon &
Cia, 24-26 November 1924, lot 99.
The private collection of Vern Holcomb and Bob Kongsli, San José, California, USA, by the 1970s.
Private collection at the Cartier Mansion; New York City, USA, by the 1980s.
The Property of a Private Foundation; Sotheby’s, London, 27 September 1991, lot 35.
Private Japanese collection; until acquired by the present owner.
Literature
C. Payne, François Linke 1855-1946 The Belle Epoque of French Furniture, Woodbridge, 2003, p. 147, 150, p 152 (pl. 159) illustrated.
Exhibited
Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1900 (the model).
Special notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.
This lot will be removed to Christie’s Park Royal. Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. Our removal and storage of the lot is subject to the terms and conditions of storage which can be found at Christies.com/storage and our fees for storage are set out in the table below - these will apply whether the lot remains with Christie’s or is removed elsewhere. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Christie’s Park Royal. All collections from Christie’s Park Royal will be by pre-booked appointment only. Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Email: cscollectionsuk@christies.com. If the lot remains at Christie’s it will be available for collection on any working day 9.00 am to 5.00 pm. Lots are not available for collection at weekends.
Sale room notice
Please note that although not indicated in the printed catalogue, this lot is subject to Temporary Admission in the EU. An amount in lieu of the import tax is applied to the hammer price and is at the reduced rate of 5%. Non EC buyers must export star items using the CPC 3153 000 within 30 days from the date of collection.



Brought to you by

Katharine Cooke
Katharine Cooke

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

This very rare fauteuil de bureau, Index Number 703, was made by François Linke to accompany his magnum opus the Grand Bureau, Index Number 550. The original chair and desk were shown together on Linke’s stand at the Paris Exposition universelle of 1900 which established his reputation as the greatest ébéniste of the Belle Époque. The chair is the perfect embodiment Le Style Linke in that it fuses the delicate curvilinear shape of a Louis XV fauteuil with flourishing Art Nouveau sculptural gilt-bronze mounts. The artistic genius behind Linke’s success at the 1900 Exposition was the designer and sculptor Léon Messagé who is credited with creating this new Art Nouveau interpretation of the rococo.
Messagé charged 1,500 francs for the preliminary design and Linke’s workshop chair maker, Monsieur Rimbaut, made a full-size gabarit (template) in poplar in February 1899 for 50 francs. A total of 550 hours was spent on sculpting, of which Leon Messagé’s time alone amounted to 111 hours charged at 5.50 francs per hour. Monsieur Marseiller took 327 hours to make the palissandre veneered frame charged at 1 franc per hour. Other costs were 120 francs for bronze casting, 100 for timber, 1124 for ciselure and 359 for mounting of the bronzes. The total cost of production came to an astonishing 4,631 francs; with a retail price at the 1900 Exhibition of 10,000 francs (op. cit., Payne., p. 147 & 150).
The 1900 exhibition chair was sold in 1901 with the Grand Bureau to the London financier Solomon Barnato Joel (1865-1931), known as Solly Joel, who found fortune in the diamond mines in South Africa. A second example of this chair was made in 1903 and was bought together with another Grand Bureau, by Antonio Devoto, an Italian émigré to Argentina who became one of the richest men in South America. A third chair was made in 1919, possibly for the Bolivian tin magnate Simon Iturri Patiño. Of the three chairs made, only the present example is recorded on the market and the whereabouts of the other two is not known.

More from The Exceptional Sale 2018

View All
View All