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A GEORGE III LIMEWOOD OPEN ARMCHAIR
A GEORGE III LIMEWOOD OPEN ARMCHAIR

Details
A GEORGE III LIMEWOOD OPEN ARMCHAIR
The rectangular padded back, arms and drop-in seat covered with gilt threaded yellow silk fabric with oak-leaf wreath and a coronet, the eared back frame carved with entrelacs and surmounted by a flowerhead, the arms with palmette trails above a seat-rail carved with floral cornucopiae and ribbon-tied foliate wreaths, on straight legs with husktrail surmounted by a patera, on gadrooned ball feet, previously decorated and lacking some applied carved decoration to the legs and to the eared back, with batton holes to the underside of rails, the scrolled brackets later, the drop-in seat replaced
Provenance
Possibly supplied to Catherine Chetwynd (d.1785), daughter of the 2nd Viscount Chetwynd and heiress of Ingestre Hall, and by descent to her son
John Chetwynd Talbot, 1st Earl Talbot (1749-1793), and by descent at Ingestre Hall to
The Earls of Shrewsbury, until at least 1957.
Literature
G. Nares, 'Ingestre Hall, Staffordshire - III', Country Life, 31 October 1957, p. 925, fig. 4 (illustrated in situ in the Long Drawing-Room).

FOR CHAIRS OF THIS MODEL

M. Jourdain and F. Rose, English Furniture, The Georgian Period (1750-1830), London, 1953, p. 61, fig. 14 (with original white and green painted decoration).

Lot Essay

The Louis Seize fashioned armchair, embellished with Grecian palms, has a tablet back wreathed by a pearled ribbon-guilloche and pilaster legs terminating in reed-clustered spheres. Its antique or Etruscan style relates to that promoted by Robert and James Adam's Works in Architecture, 1774, and in particular to their Derby House commode, executed by Messrs. Mayhew and Ince, upholsterers and cabinet-makers of Golden Square (see L. Wood, Catalogue of Commodes, London, 1994, no. 23, fig. 197). Peace and Plenty is celebrated by a floral-wreath medallion displayed on the cresting, flower-festooned legs, and trophies of Ceres' flower-filled cornucopiae framed by flowered patterae on the rails. The chair, originally japanned white and green, forms part of a suite that is likely to have been executed by Mayhew and Ince. It was probably commissioned in the mid-1770s by the Hon. John Chetwynd Talbot, who succeeded as third Baron Talbot of Hensol and was created Viscount Ingestre and Earl Talbot in 1784 (d. 1793). In 1773 he is recorded as purchasing vases from Matthew Boulton (see N. Goodison, Ormolu: The Work of Matthew Boulton, London, 1974, p. 237). Two of the suite of chairs are illustrated in situ at Ingestre Hall, Staffordshire (op. cit.).

A chair of this model in beechwood with its original decoration is illustrated in M. Jourdain and F. Rose, English Furniture, The Georgian Period (1750-1830), London, 1953, p. 61, fig. 14.
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