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A GEORGE III MAHOGANY, YEWWOOD AND ROSEWOOD PEMBROKE TABLE
A GEORGE III MAHOGANY, YEWWOOD AND ROSEWOOD PEMBROKE TABLE

POSSIBLY BY MAYHEW AND INCE, CIRCA 1770

Details
A GEORGE III MAHOGANY, YEWWOOD AND ROSEWOOD PEMBROKE TABLE
POSSIBLY BY MAYHEW AND INCE, CIRCA 1770
The rounded rectangular top with chequer-strung and crossbanded edge above a mahogany and cedar-lined frieze drawer, opposed by a false drawer on moulded yewwood panelled square tapered legs with spade feet, originally with brackets to the tops of the legs, the moulded edge to top probably originally ebonised
28½ in. (72.5 cm.) high, 37 in. (94 cm.) wide, open, 19¾ in. (50 cm.) closed, 29¼ in. (74 cm.) deep

Lot Essay

The prominent use of yewwood and the remnants of the ebonising to the edge of the top are some of the many features that have been identified as characteristic of the Golden Square firm of Mayhew and Ince (see: The Dictionary of English Furniture Makers 1660-1840, Leeds, 1986, pp. 589-593). Prime among these is the use of yewwood as a large scale veneer, 'the only wholly idiosyncratic veneer wood the firm used and possibly unique to Mayhew and Ince among London cabinet-makers of this date' (ibid., p. 593). The firm supplied a veneered yewwood commode to Sir Brook Bridges of Goodnestone Park, Kent, that was exhibited in Treasures from Kent Houses, Royal Museum, Canterbury, September-October 1984, no. 57.
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