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A GEORGE III POLYCHROME-PAINTED DUMMY-BOARD
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more
A GEORGE III POLYCHROME-PAINTED DUMMY-BOARD

LAST QUARTER 18TH CENTURY

Details
A GEORGE III POLYCHROME-PAINTED DUMMY-BOARD
LAST QUARTER 18TH CENTURY
Depicting a maid with a broom, wearing a lace bonnet and a pearl necklace, with later strut supports
70 in. (178 cm.) high; 27 ¼ in. (69 cm.) wide; 18 ¼ in. (46.5 cm.) deep
Provenance
Christopher Gibbs, The Manor House at Clifton Hampden; Christie's house sale, 25-26 September 2000, lot 44.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.
All sold and unsold lots marked with a filled square in the catalogue that are not cleared from Christie’s by 5:00 pm on the day of the sale, and all sold and unsold lots not cleared from Christie’s by 5:00 pm on the fifth Friday following the sale, will be removed to the warehouse of ‘Cadogan Tate’. Please note that there will be no charge to purchasers who collect their lots within two weeks of this sale.

Condition report

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Lot Essay

The 'Housewife with her Broom' was, according to Ned Ward in The London Spy, 1700, 'very usually set up in Great Families as good Examples to Servant Wenches, to make 'em mindful of their Cleanliness'. One such sweeper featured amongst the 'cut out pieces to stand upon the stairs' that were listed in the inventory at Cobham Hall, Kent (1672), and noted by John Abdy Repton in the Gentleman's Magazine, November 1845 (p. 590) as 'a painting...cut out of a board'. Such wooden templates 'large as life' have also been known since the 19th Century as 'picture board dummies'. Dummy-boards had a variety of purposes, but primarily they were used as whimsical decoration in private houses, where they depicted maid servants or butlers who welcomed the guests. They were also used to disguise empty fireplaces in the summer. A pair of dummy-boards symbolising Vanity and Industry (Industry shown holding a broom) in the costume of the mid-17th Century were formerly at Sutton Park, Kent (C. Graham Dummy Boards and Chimney Boards, Aylesbury, 1988, p. 13). A dummy-board of similar subject was sold Christie's London, 8 February 1996, lot 9.

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