A GOLD AND ENAMEL ORDER OF ST. ANDREW THE FIRST-CALLED
THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR
A GOLD AND ENAMEL ORDER OF ST. ANDREW THE FIRST-CALLED

MARK OF JULIUS KEIBEL WITH THE IMPERIAL WARRANT, ST. PETERSBURG, 1865

Details
A GOLD AND ENAMEL ORDER OF ST. ANDREW THE FIRST-CALLED
MARK OF JULIUS KEIBEL WITH THE IMPERIAL WARRANT, ST. PETERSBURG, 1865
Designed as a black enamel Imperial double-headed eagle applied with the St. Andrew cross with the saint crucified upon it, surmounted by an enamel Imperial crown, with later added pale blue moiré silk sash, indistinctly marked throughout
The badge 4 in. (10.2 cm.) high
Provenance
A Private Collection, Christie's, April 21, 1998, lot 7 (without sash). Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

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Anne Bracegirdle
Anne Bracegirdle

Lot Essay

The Order of St. Andrew the First-Called was the oldest and highest Russian award until 1917. While it was founded by Peter the Great (1672 -1725) at the end of the seventeenth century, the official decree defining the statute was not approved until 1797. By introducing the Order, Peter I was aiming to replace and Europeanize the old Russian award system, in which the ruler bestowed gold medals of various size and weight. This was the only Order that was worn with a collar on special occasions.
After the death of Peter I, the Order of St. Andrew was awarded to all male members of the Imperial family upon birth.
From the mid-nineteenth century, recipients of the Order of St. Andrew also automatically received the Order of Alexander Nevsky, the Order of the White Eagle, the Order of St. Anne First Class, and the Order of St. Stanislas First Class.
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