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A GOTHIC-STYLE ENAMELED GOLD PLAQUE
A GOTHIC-STYLE ENAMELED GOLD PLAQUE
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A GOTHIC-STYLE ENAMELED GOLD PLAQUE

THE FRAME PROBABLY BY ALFRED ANDRÉ, PARIS, CIRCA 1860; THE PLAQUE EARLIER

Details
A GOTHIC-STYLE ENAMELED GOLD PLAQUE
THE FRAME PROBABLY BY ALFRED ANDRÉ, PARIS, CIRCA 1860; THE PLAQUE EARLIER
The rectangular plaque basse taille enameled in colors with central scene of The Crucifixion with the Instruments of the Passion and flanked by the Virgin and Child and Saint George and the Dragon, the lower register with Saint Catherine, Saint Christopher with the Christ Child, Saint Stephen and Saint Barbara, with the kneeling figure of the donor in the center, the upper register with the Angel of the Annunciation and the Virgin on either side of God the Father, in Spanish style pierced rectangular frame, with suspension loop
2 1/2 in. (8.8 cm.) high overall
Provenance
Baron Alphonse de Rothschild (1827-1905), Paris.
Baron Edouard de Rothschild (1868-1949), Paris.
Confiscated from the above following the Nazi occupation of Paris by the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg after May 1940 and transferred to the Jeu de Paume (ERR no. R 2478).
Recovered by the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section from the ‘Lager Pater’ salt mines, Alt Aussee, and transferred to the Central Collecting Point, Munich, June 28, 1945 (MCCP no. 1371/84).
Repatriated to France July 11, 1946 and restituted to the Rothschild Collection.
Baroness Batsheva de Rothschild (1914-1999), Tel Aviv, sold
Christie's, London, 14 December 2000, lot 59.
Sale Room Notice
The plaque probably Paris, late 14th or early 15th century, the frame probably by Alfred Andre, Paris, circa 1860.

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Becky MacGuire
Becky MacGuire

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Lot Essay

Although it does not appear to fit into any known school, the plaque is closest in style to Flemish work of the first half of the 15th century. However, the crowded appearance of the scenes and the placing of the Annunciation on either side of the Crucifixion is unusual.

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