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A handwritten history of Game Theory at Princeton
A handwritten history of Game Theory at Princeton
A handwritten history of Game Theory at Princeton
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A handwritten history of Game Theory at Princeton

JOHN FORBES NASH, JR., 2000S

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A handwritten history of Game Theory at Princeton
John Forbes Nash, Jr., 2000s
NASH, JR. John Forbes (1928-2015). Autograph manuscript, no place [late 1990s-2000s].

11 pages, 215 x 280mm, ink on lined paper. Provenance: John Forbes Nash, Jr.

Nash's handwritten lecture on Game Theory at Princeton University. At the time of his death in 2015, Nash had been associated with Princeton for nearly 70 years, first as an ingenious doctoral student and for the final ten years of his life as a senior research mathematician. After winning the Nobel Prize in 1994, Nash entered a long period of renewed activity and confidence, and here he looks back on the field. His overview begins with the contributions of French mathematician and politician Emile Borel followed by Princeton colleagues John von Neumann and Oskar Morgenstern (he notes that von Neumann "entered the picture" in 1928, the year of his own birth). Nash comments that "scientific concepts often are discovered in stages," and credits Antoine Augustin Cournot and Frederik Zeuthen's work ahead of his own, as well as Shizuo Kakutani's fixed-point theorem. He also touches on the work of Albert Tucker, Alvin Roth, David Gale, Robert Aumann, and Lloyd Shapley.

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