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A ITALIAN MARBLE FIGURE OF A BOY, POSSIBLY THE YOUNG MARK TWAIN

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.
A ITALIAN MARBLE FIGURE OF A BOY, POSSIBLY THE YOUNG MARK TWAIN

BY EMILIO ZOCCHI, FLORENCE, LATE 19TH CENTURY

Details
A ITALIAN MARBLE FIGURE OF A BOY, POSSIBLY THE YOUNG MARK TWAIN BY EMILIO ZOCCHI, FLORENCE, LATE 19TH CENTURY Signed 'ZOCCHI E. FIRENZE', on a later faux marble composite pedestal The marble: 37 in. (94 cm.) high The pedestal: 37 in. (94 cm.) high; 22 in. (56 cm.) square at top (2)
Special Notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.

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Anne Qaimmaqami

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Lot Essay

Emilio Zocchi (1835-1913) studied under Torrini and Costalli in Florence. He sculpted busts, bas-reliefs and statuettes of Mythological, Classical and Renaissance figures. This lot is similar in composition to his well-known marble of the young Michelangelo sculpting, an example of which sold Christie's, London, 26 October 2000, lot 108 (£41,125). Another version is now in the Galleria Palatina, Palazzo Pitti, Florence.

The subject here is a young typesetter seated on a stack of books. Zocchi also sculpted marbles of American historical figures as children, such as Benjamin Franklin, and it is possible that the subject here is the young Mark Twain. In March 1847, when Twain was 11, his father died of pneumonia. The next year, he became a printer's apprentice. In 1851, he began working as a typesetter and contributor of articles and humorous sketches for the Hannibal Journal, a newspaper owned by his brother Orion. As becoming of the future author, fittingly the boy's brow is furrowed in concentration as if he is more engrossed in reading the book than in copying it.

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