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A LARGE AND RARE SOVIET PORCELAIN PROPAGANDA PLATTER
A LARGE AND RARE SOVIET PORCELAIN PROPAGANDA PLATTER
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A LARGE AND RARE SOVIET PORCELAIN PROPAGANDA PLATTER

BY THE IMPERIAL PORCELAIN FACTORY, ST PETERSBURG, PERIOD OF NICHOLAS II, 1906, AND THE STATE PORCELAIN FACTORY, PETROGRAD, 1923

Details
A LARGE AND RARE SOVIET PORCELAIN PROPAGANDA PLATTER
BY THE IMPERIAL PORCELAIN FACTORY, ST PETERSBURG, PERIOD OF NICHOLAS II, 1906, AND THE STATE PORCELAIN FACTORY, PETROGRAD, 1923
After the design by Anton Komashka, the centre painted with a worker holding a hammer, within an industrial cityscape, inscribed in Russian 'USSR' on the right, all within yellow rims, marked under base with green underglaze Imperial Porcelain Factory mark and blue overglaze hammer, sickle and cog, and the date ‘1923’, also numbered '465/2', with an old label under base stamped with a red star and the inscription 'Torgsector'
14 1/8 in. (36 cm.) diameter

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Alexis de Tiesenhausen
Alexis de Tiesenhausen

Lot Essay

This platter is painted after a design by Anton Komashka, and is one of the few works by this artist known to exist. According to archival documents, only two platters titled A Worker with a Hammer after Komashka's design were produced in 1923. The second platter, numbered '465/1', is held in the collection of the Kuskovo Museum, Moscow (see B.I.Alekseev, Sovetskiy Hudozhestvenniy Farfor 1918-1923, Moscow, 1962, p. 26).

It is possible to suggest that the label under the base is an exhibition label from the Soviet Pavilion at the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes in Paris in 1925. The Soviet Pavilion, designed by Konstantin Melnikov, consisted of a few buildings. One of them was called Torgsector and was located on the Esplanade des Invalides. As the name Torgsector [Sale Sector] suggests, the pavilion was dedicated to promoting Soviet products, including porcelain, books, textiles, etc.

We are grateful to Vladimir Levshenkov for his assistance with the research of the present lot.

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