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A LONDON DELFT BLUE AND WHITE POPISH PLOT PLATE
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A LONDON DELFT BLUE AND WHITE POPISH PLOT PLATE

1679-1680, POSSIBLY JOHN ARIENS VAN HAMME'S FACTORY, COPTHALL OR VAUXHALL

Details
A LONDON DELFT BLUE AND WHITE POPISH PLOT PLATE
1679-1680, POSSIBLY JOHN ARIENS VAN HAMME'S FACTORY, COPTHALL OR VAUXHALL
The centre painted with The Conspirators Signeing ye/resolve for killing the/king inscribed below, within a border of tulips, carnations, roses and other flowers
8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm.) diam.
Provenance
Louis L. Lipski; Sotheby's, London, 10 March 1981, lot 46.
Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, New York, 20 October 1993, lot 23.
Literature
Leslie B. Grigsby, The Longridge Catalogue, Vol. II, D16.
Anthony Ray, English Delftware Tiles, London, 1973, p. 114, in connection with the similarly decorated tile, no. 9.
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VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 17.5% on the buyer's premium.

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Lot Essay

The 'Popish Plot' of 1678 was an alleged conspiracy by Roman Catholics to kill Charles II and replace him with his Catholic brother James, Duke of York. The plot was invented by an Anglican clergyman, Titus Oates (1649-1705), who asserted before the magistrate Sir Edmundbury Godfrey that he knew of a plot to kill not only the king and his councillors, but Protestants would be widely massacred and the French would invade Ireland. Sir Edmundbury Godfrey was murdered shortly afterwards thus gaining Oates and his supporters credibility; later Lord Shaftsbury acquiesced in using Oates's plot as a means to secure James's exclusion from the throne. A nationwide panic ensued during which more than 80 innocent people were condemned before Oates was discredited. He was punished for perjury, but survived to receive a pension from William III.

See Michael Archer, Delftware The Tin-glazed Earthenware of the British Isles, London, 1997, pp. 429-430, N. 10-18 for nine tiles from the Schreiber Collection painted in blue illustrating the Plot (No. 823.1-9). Archer suggests that these were possibly made by Jan Ariens van Hamme, who had a warrant issued to him in 1676 to make tiles 'after the way practised in Holland which hath not been practised in this our kingdom'. The attribution of the plate to van Hamme is further strengthened by the Dutch style of the calligraphy and drawing.
See a number of manganese tiles with these scenes from the collection of Dr. Lindsay, sold Christie's, South Kensington, 29 March 2009, lots 124-128. Another set of twenty-one tiles from the Anthony W. Pullen Collection was sold Sotheby's, London, 15 March 1971, lot 21.

See also Anthony Ray, English Delftware Tiles,, London, 1973, pp. 61, 114-115, nos. 8-19, figs 36a-36c., and Jonathan Horne, English Tin-glazed Tiles,, London, 1989, p. 17, no. 12.

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