A LONDON DELFT MANGANESE-GROUND NAMED AND DATED CUP
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A LONDON DELFT MANGANESE-GROUND NAMED AND DATED CUP

1635, SOUTHWARK, PICKLEHERRING QUAY OR MONTAGUE CLOSE

Details
A LONDON DELFT MANGANESE-GROUND NAMED AND DATED CUP
1635, SOUTHWARK, PICKLEHERRING QUAY OR MONTAGUE CLOSE
Globular with a loop handle, named in blue and dated THOMAS·HVNT·OF·EDEN 1635 within a shaded double-line elongated rectangular label, on a powdered-manganese ground between blue rims (faint hairline cracks from rim and minor chipping to rims)
4¼ in. (10.8 cm.) high
Provenance
Anonymous; Christie's, London, 3 February 1975, lot 187.
With Winifred Williams.
Harriet Carlton Goldweitz; Sotheby's, New York, 20 January 2006, lot 7. With Jonathan Horne, London.
Literature
Ivor Noël Hume, 'Early English Delftware from London and Virginia', Colonial Williamsburg Occasional Papers in Archaeology, Williamsburg, 1977, Vol. 2, p. 29.
Louis L. Lipski and Michael Archer, Dated English Delftware, London, 1984, p.159, no. 716.
Harriet Carlton Goldweitz, 'An American Collection of English Pottery: A Chronology 1635-1778', English Ceramic Circle, Transactions, 1984, Vol. 12, Pt. 1, pp. 11-12, pls. 16a-b.
Exhibited
Providence, Rhode Island, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Rhode Island Collects Ceramics, 7 February-27 April 1997, no. 47.
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.

Lot Essay

The identity of the original owner of the present mug remains elusive. It is unusual however that two surviving named and dated delftware mugs appear to be for the same recipient. A powdered-blue ground mug in the City Museum and Art Gallery, Birmingham is named for THOMAS HUNT AND MARY 1638, inscribed within a shaded elongated cartouche similar to the present mug. When this cup has appeared at auction before, reference has been made to a Thomas Hunt (1611-1683) born in Worcester who entered Pembroke College, Oxford, proceeding to his M.A. in 1636. He later became Master of the Church School of St. Dunstan's-in-the-East, London. It has also been noted that the Parish of Castle Eden near Durham, is recorded by Samuel Lewis in his Topographical Dictionary of England published in 1848. Harriet Carlton Goldweitz, ibid. points out the significance of this cup in the context of fragments excavated in Jamestown, Virginia which put the cup in a contemporary context. Frank Britton, London Delftware, London, 1987, p. 121 illustrates three vessels, including a caudle-cup, with similar manganese decoration which were excavated from a cesspool at Broadway, Hammersmith. There were business connections between the London delft manufacturers and Virginia which would explain the appearence of similar wares in Colonial America. Michael Archer highlights the examples of Sir Thomas Smith who was a partner in a London pot-house and treasurer of the Virginia Company until 1619 and Sir John Harvey, Governor of Virginia in the second quarter of the 17th century, who had links Christian Wilhelm, a potter at Picklherring Quay, Southwark. See Michael Archer and Brian Morgan, 'Fair as China Dishes, English Delftware from the Collection of Mrs. Marion Morgan and Brian Morgan', Exhibition Catalogue, London, 1977, p. 11. Perhaps a Colonial recipient should not be discounted.

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