Browse Lots

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE-MOUNTED CHINESE AND CHANTILLY PORCELAIN MANTEL CLOCK
A LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE-MOUNTED CHINESE AND CHANTILLY PORCELAIN MANTEL CLOCK
1 More
On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial int… Read more
A LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE-MOUNTED CHINESE AND CHANTILLY PORCELAIN MANTEL CLOCK

CIRCA 1745

Details
A LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE-MOUNTED CHINESE AND CHANTILLY PORCELAIN MANTEL CLOCK
CIRCA 1745
The circular case set within floral sprig branches and supported by two kneeling Ho Ho boys, the dial and movement signed ALEXANDRE BROCHET PARIS, the underside with red-painted inventory number S.L.2403.2
12 ½ in. (32 cm.) high, 10 ½ in. (26.5 cm.) wide
Provenance
Acquired from Kraemer, Paris, in 1975.
Special notice

On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial interest in the outcome of the sale of certain lots consigned for sale. This will usually be where it has guaranteed to the Seller that whatever the outcome of the auction, the Seller will receive a minimum sale price for the work. This is known as a minimum price guarantee. This is a lot where Christie’s holds a direct financial guarantee interest.

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Alexandre Brochet received his maîtrise in 1729 and was recorded working on the Rue de la Verrerie from 1740-56.

This charming clock, with its drum-form base and kneeling magot figures in imitation of Chinese porcelain, festooned with porcelain flowers and on a distinctive rockwork base, relates to a well-known group of similar clocks which more normally feature figures in lacquered bronze attributed to the celebrated Martin frères, whose skill with lacquer was so renowned that it came to be known as ‘vernis martin’. A closely related clock with bronze figures was sold in An American Dynasty: The Clark Family Treasures, Christie's, New York, 18 June 2014, lot 115 ($137,500), while others are discussed in A. Forray Carlier and M. Kopplin, Les Secrets de la Laque Française, exh. cat., Paris, 2014, pp. 100-1. The Stafford clock in turn has the rare feature of figures in porcelain.
France's long fascination with the Orient dates to the mid-17th century, when lacquered screens, porcelains and other wares were imported and adapted into some of the rarest, most sophisticated objects produced in the 17th and 18th centuries. Parisian marchands-merciers such as Thomas-Joachim Hébert, Simon-Philippe Poirier and Lazare Duvaux sought to capitalize on the huge demand for these rare objects, and created their own versions of these prized imports. Using them for inspiration, along with contemporary engravings of the Chinese Emperor's court and designs by ornemanistes, the marchands-merciers created and promoted their own distinct aesthetic, the goût chinois, which was realized by a network of highly skilled artisans. These fanciful works were prized by the court of Louis XV and particularly by the celebrated connoisseur and Royal mistress, Madame du Pompadour, whose passion for chinoiserie and Japanese lacquer is well-documented.

More from A Love Affair with France: The Elizabeth Stafford Collection

View All
View All