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A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED BOIS SATINE, TULIPWOOD AND PARQUETRY BONHEUR DU JOUR
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED BOIS SATINE, TULIPWOOD AND PARQUETRY BONHEUR DU JOUR
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED BOIS SATINE, TULIPWOOD AND PARQUETRY BONHEUR DU JOUR
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Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED BOIS SATINE, TULIPWOOD AND PARQUETRY BONHEUR DU JOUR

ATTRIBUTED TO ROGER VANDERCRUSE, KNOWN AS LACROIX, CIRCA 1775

Details
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED BOIS SATINE, TULIPWOOD AND PARQUETRY BONHEUR DU JOUR
ATTRIBUTED TO ROGER VANDERCRUSE, KNOWN AS LACROIX, CIRCA 1775
With a galleried white marble top above a door and niche, the lower case with a drawer opening to a tooled leather writing surface, on square tapering legs joined by a medial shelf, restorations to veneers
40 ½ in. (103 cm.) high, 26 ¾ in. (68 cm.) wide, 12 ½ in. (32 cm.) deep
Provenance
Acquired by Baron Meyer Amschel de Rothschild for Mentmore Towers, Buckinghamshire, by descent to his daughter and heiress,
Hannah, Countess of Rosebery (d.1890), wife of 5th Earl of Rosebery (1847-1929), by descent to their son,
Harry Primrose, 6th Earl of Rosebery (1882-1974) by whom offered Christie's, London, 4 May 1939, lot 92.
Acquired from Kraemer, Paris, 1953.
Literature
F.J.B. Watson, The Wrightsman Collection, vol. I, Greenwich, 1966, p. 180, no. 103.
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.
Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services (CFASS in Red Hook, Brooklyn) at 5pm on the last day of the sale. Lots may not be collected during the day of their move to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services. Please consult the Lot Collection Notice for collection information. This sheet is available from the Bidder Registration staff, Purchaser Payments or the Packing Desk and will be sent with your invoice.

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Lot Essay

Roger Vandercruse, known as Lacroix, maître in 1755.
Roger van der Cruse, known as Lacroix, was one of the premier ébénistes who worked in the transitional style between the Louis XV and Louis XVI eras. He was born the son of the ouvrier libre François van der Cruse in 1728 and was related by his sisters’ marriage to the maître-ébénistes Jean-François Oeben and to Jean-Henri Riesener. Elected maître in 1755, Roger took over his father's business and was soon supplying furniture to the ébéniste Pierre II Migeon, the marchand-mercier Simon-Philippe Poirier and directly to Madame du Barry at Louveciennes, the Garde-Meuble and the duc d'Orléans.
The art collections at Mentmore were among the most outstanding of their kind anywhere in the world, prompting Lady Eastlake to comment: 'I do not believe that the Medici were ever so lodged at the height of their glory'. Mentmore was built between 1852 and 1854 by Baron Mayer Amschel de Rothschild, who needed a house near to London and in close proximity to other Rothschild homes at Tring, Ascot, Aston Clinton and later Waddesdon and Halton House. The plans for the mansion imitated Wollaton Hall in Nottinghamshire and were drawn up by the gardener turned architect Joseph Paxton, celebrated for his Crystal Palace, completed the year earlier. Sumptuously furnished with extraordinary works of art in every field, on his death in 1874, Baron Mayer left Mentmore and a fortune of some £2,000,000 to his daughter, Hannah de Rothschild. Four years later Hannah married Archibald Philip, 5th Earl of Rosebery, who added considerably to the collections assembled by his father-in-law and it remained largely intact until the dispersal of the contents in 1977.

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