A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED JAPANESE LACQUER AND EBONY OCCASIONAL TABLE
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED JAPANESE LACQUER AND EBONY OCCASIONAL TABLE
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED JAPANESE LACQUER AND EBONY OCCASIONAL TABLE
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A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED JAPANESE LACQUER AND EBONY OCCASIONAL TABLE
8 More
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION (LOTS 45-53)
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED JAPANESE LACQUER AND EBONY OCCASIONAL TABLE

ATTRIBUTED TO ADAM WEISWEILER, CIRCA 1785

Details
A LOUIS XVI ORMOLU-MOUNTED JAPANESE LACQUER AND EBONY OCCASIONAL TABLE
ATTRIBUTED TO ADAM WEISWEILER, CIRCA 1785
The rectangular Spanish brocatelle marble inset top with pierced three-quarter gallery above a frieze drawer inset with a japanese lacquer panel depicting a rocky landscape with a pagoda within a beaded border, the sides and back conformingly decorated with lacquer panels depicting a moonset and coastal landscapes, above a conformingly inset marble undertier, on unscrewable circular tapering legs with bead-cast sabots, the underside of top with a CHENUE S.A.R.L. printed depositry label inscribed 'Ma. R. Ancel / 20 Rue Daru' in black pen, with further circular label inscribed '60' in pen, the undertier platform with a further label to the underside inscribed 'coll.J.D./38/M.' in pen; two sabots possibly replaced
32 ½ in. (83 cm.) high; 17 ¾ in. (45 cm.) wide; 14 ½ in. (37 cm.) deep
Provenance
The Collection of Jacques Doucet (1853-1929), Paris; sold Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 7-8 January 1912, lot 335.
The Collection of Madame R. Ancel, 20 Rue Daru, Paris, according to paper label.

Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU or, if the UK has withdrawn from the EU without an agreed transition deal, from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.
Specified lots are being stored at Crozier Park Royal (details below) or will be removed from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London, SW1Y 6QT by 5.00pm on the day of the sale. Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. If the lot has been transferred to Crozier Park Royal, it will be available for collection from 12.00pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crozier Park Royal. All collections from Crozier Park Royal will be by pre-booked appointment only. Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Email: cscollectionsuk@christies.com. If the lot remains at Christie’s, 8 King Street, it will be available for collection on any working day (not weekends) from 9.00am to 5.00pm

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Lot Essay


Adam Weisweiler, maître in 1778.

Embellished with costly Japanese lacquer, this elegant table is a superb example of the work of Adam Weisweiler at the height of his powers, when this ébéniste delivered a number of masterpieces to the Royal family, all commissioned through the famous marchand-mercier Dominique Daguerre (d. 1796). This includes the monumental secretaire supplied in January 1784 to Louis XVI's cabinet Interieur at Versailles, which is one of his earliest and most richly-mounted pieces of lacquer furniture (O. Impey and J. Whitehead, 'From Japanese box to French Royal furniture', Apollo, September 1990, p. 163). With its elegant proportions and exacting craftsmanship, it is unsurprising that it once belonged to the legendary fashion-designer Jacques Doucet (1853-1929).

In essence, it continued the tradition of furniture mounted with Sèvres porcelain plaques as pioneered in the 1760s by Dominique Daguerre’s business partner Simon-Philippe Poirier (d. 1785), who maintained a monopoly for the sale of this type of furniture – almost exclusively executed by Martin Carlin (d. 1785) - until Daguerre took over the running of the business in 1777. The ‘ever-lasting’ flower pictures in porcelain which adorned these precious items of furniture were more sporadically being employed after Daguerre took the reins, and only a dozen were apparently made after this date (A. Pradere, Les Ebenistes Francais, Paris, 1989, p. 344).
A distinctive group of jewellike tables of similar outline - with rounded corners, short cabriole legs and a lower shelf with incurved front – were executed by Carlin for Daguerre from circa 1780. Two of these are mounted with Sèvres porcelain plaques, one in the Huntington Collection, with plaques dated 1781 (C. Sargentson, The Huntington Collection, San Marino, 2008, pp. 104-107); the other in the Wallace Collection (F327) with plaques dated 1783-’84 (P. Hughes, The Wallace Collection, London, 1996, vol. II, pp 1100-’08). The others – probably around twelve - were fitted with Japanese lacquer panels, also indicating that Japanese lacquer had superseded Sèvres porcelain as the preferred type of decoration of Daguerre’s most luxurious furniture. These include one from the Grog-Carven Collection, now in the Louvre (D. Alcouffe et. al., Furniture Collections of the Louvre, Paris, 1993, no. 71, pp. 230-’31); one from the collection of Jacques and Henriette Schumann, Christie’s Paris, 30 September 2003, lot 472 (€470,250) and a further example formerly from the collection of Henri de Rothschild, sold Christie’s London, ‘Boulle to Jansen’, 11 June 2003, lot 15 (£218,000).

By 1783-’85, towards the end of Carlin’s life - Daguerre modernised the form of some his furniture types as well as developing new ones; it is probable that for a few years he would have started producing these new pieces while continuing some of the traditional forms. The design of the aforementioned work and writing-tables was also updated whereby an entirely rectilinear form was adopted, resting on turned tapering feet. One of the first examples of this type is a table in the Louvre which was executed by Carlin and is fitted with a Sèvres porcelain plaque dated ‘1784’. In the inventory complied after his death in 1785 it does not appear nor do any other tables of this type (D. Alcouffe, op. cit., no. 85, pp. 262-262). Most extant tables of this model – either in Japanese lacquer, ebony or satinwood, were executed by Adam Weisweiler, who – as Carlin’s ‘spiritual successor’ - became Daguerre’s preferred cabinet-maker for his most precious and complex pieces (P. Lemonnier, Weisweiler, Paris, 1983, p. 37). Apart from the present example, this group includes a pair of ebony and porphyry tables, stamped by Weisweiler, at Musee Nissim de Camondo, illustrated in S. Legrand-Rossi, Le Mobilier du Musee Nissim de Camondo, Paris, 2012, no. 43, pp. 126-127. Weisweiler simultaneously developed a related but slightly wider model of table, surmounted by a glazed superstructure forming a so-called bonheur-du-jour. Many of these were veneered in satinwood off-set with amaranth and with mahogany to the interior, characteristics clearly inspired by English contemporary pieces; an example is at Musee Cognacq-Jay (I. Neto, Musee Cognacq-Jay, Le Mobilier, Paris, 2001, no. 15, pp. 54-55), a further example from the Mannheimer Collection, is at the Rijkmsueum (R. Baarsen, Paris 1650-1900, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, 2013, no. 106, pp. 436-437. An almost identical table similarly mounted with Japanese lacquer panels but with a slightly larger frieze drawer sold from the collection of Countess A. Bernstorff, Christie's London, 8 June 1961, lot 17. Another table of the same model presented as 19th century was sold at Sotheby's Paris, 9 April 2008, lot 198.

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