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**A MAGNIFICENT BEIJING ENAMEL "EUROPEAN SUBJECT" SNUFF BOTTLE
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
**A MAGNIFICENT BEIJING ENAMEL "EUROPEAN SUBJECT" SNUFF BOTTLE

IMPERIAL, PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, QIANLONG BLUE ENAMEL FOUR-CHARACTER MARK AND OF THE PERIOD, 1736-1780

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**A MAGNIFICENT BEIJING ENAMEL "EUROPEAN SUBJECT" SNUFF BOTTLE
IMPERIAL, PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, QIANLONG BLUE ENAMEL FOUR-CHARACTER MARK AND OF THE PERIOD, 1736-1780
Of compressed spherical form, finely enameled with a continuous frieze in which two European dandies are shown in conversation, one of whom points towards an elegant lady in a hat carrying a basket of fruit and accompanied by a young boy, all within a landscape with a lake and distant country house set between delicate floral bands at the neck, shoulders and base giving way to elaborate scalloping, the exposed metal at the neck and the foot gilded, the base inscribed in regular script Qianlong nian zhi (Made in the Qianlong period), the gilt-bronze stopper probably original; together with a watercolor by Malcolm Golding, signed and dated 1971
1 15/16 in. (4.95 cm.) high (2)
Provenance
Sydney L. Moss Ltd.
Avery Brundage
Hugh Moss
Irving Lindzon
Hugh M. Moss Ltd. (Hong Kong, 1978)
Literature
Chinese Snuff Bottles, No. 2, p. 35, no. 2
JICSBS, December 1975, p. 7, no. 20 and p. 8, no. 23
Hugh Moss, By Imperial Command: An Introduction to Ch'ing Imperial Painted Enamels, plate 28
JICSBS, March 1978, p. 9, no. 24
Snuff Bottles of the Ch'ing Dynasty, p. 50, no. 10
JICSBS, September 1980, front cover
Viviane Jutheau, Guide du collectionneur de tabatières chinoises, p. 57, no. 7
JICSBS, Summer 1982, p. 29, fig. 8
100 Selected Chinese Snuff Bottles from the J & J Collection, front cover and no. 11
J & J poster
JICSBS, Autumn 1989, front cover
Christie's International Magazine, September-October 1987, p. 7
Arts of Asia, September-October 1987, p. 147
Christie's, London, 15-16 June 1987, p. 155
Christie's, London, 12 October 1987, a.m., p. 61 and p.m., p. 44
Moss, Graham, Tsang, The Art of the Chinese Snuff Bottle The J & J Collection, Vol. I, no. 170
JICSBS, Spring 1996, p. 10, fig. 24.
Silver Kris, January 1997, p. 48, fig. 3
The Art of the Chinese Snuff Bottle, Poly Art Museum, p. 60
Exhibited
Hugh M. Moss Ltd., London, September 1974
Hong Kong Museum of Art, October-December 1978
Christie's, London, October 1987
Christie's, New York, 1993
Empress Place Museum, Singapore, 1994
Museum für Kunsthandwerk, Frankfurt, 1996-1997
Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art, London, 1997
Naples Museum of Art, Florida, 2002
Portland Museum of Art, Oregon, 2002
National Museum of History, Taipei, 2002
International Asian Art Fair, Seventh Regiment Armory, New York, 2003
Poly Art Museum, Beijing, 2003
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Lot Essay

This exceptional bottle undoubtedly ranks among the finest Imperial painted enamel bottles, a group in which masterpieces are standard. The subject matter clearly shows the influence of eighteenth-century French painters such as Watteau and Boucher, which was transmitted by contemporaneous French enamellers to Jesuit artists at the Chinese Court, who in turn passed it on to the craftsman employed at the Imperial workshops at Beijing. French and Swiss painted-enamel panels and other objects were sent to the Court at Beijing throughout the first half of the Qing dynasty to inspire and instruct the Court enamellers and ingratiate the Jesuits with the Emperor.
It is perhaps of little surprise that this extraordinary bottle caught the eye of Avery Brundage, whose collection now forms the core of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. When Moss began to work at his father's gallery in the early-1960s, Brundage was always very kind to him on his frequent visits, encouraging him and taking the time to teach him about Chinese art. When he found out that Moss had begun to form a serious collection of Chinese snuff bottles of his own, he generously allowed Moss to purchase it at the price previously paid to his father.

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