search

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A SASANIAN PARCEL GILT SILVER DISH
A SASANIAN PARCEL GILT SILVER DISH
A SASANIAN PARCEL GILT SILVER DISH
2 More
PROPERTY FROM A PRINCELY COLLECTION
A MESOPOTAMIAN GOLD BULL PENDANT

EARLY DYNASTIC III, CIRCA 2550-2250 B.C.

Details
A MESOPOTAMIAN GOLD BULL PENDANT
EARLY DYNASTIC III, CIRCA 2550-2250 B.C.
1 ½ in. (3.8 cm.) high
Provenance
Reputedly with Joseph Altounian (1889-1954), Paris and Mâcon.
with N. Koutoulakis (1910-1996), Geneva and Paris, 1970s.
with Galerie Nefer, Zurich, 1993.
with Robin Symes, London, 1995.
US private collection, acquired from the above.
Literature
Exhibition Catalogue, Ancient Jewellery from the Near East and Egypt, Galerie Nefer, Switzerland, Spring 1993.
Sale room notice
Please note, this lot has also been published in: Exhibition Catalogue, Ancient Jewellery from the Near East and Egypt, Galerie Nefer, Switzerland, Spring 1993.

Brought to you by

Claudio Corsi
Claudio Corsi Specialist

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

This exquisite gold pendant is solid cast and is distinguished by its fine and detailed workmanship. The bull was considered the embodiment of strength and fertility and was a popular motif in Mesopotamian art. The eyes and triangular-shaped indentation on the forehead would have once been inlaid. Although the significance of the now-missing triangular inlay on the forehead is unknown, it emphasises the numinous character of the bull and most likely had a particular meaning beyond its use as a decorative element.
The very high quality workmanship suggests that this pendant may have been commissioned or owned by a royal patron. For a similar bull in copper-alloy, cf. acc. no. VA 3142 in the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Vorderasiatisches Museum and for a bull fitting with a triangular inlay on the forehead, see no. 95 in Aruz, ed., Art of the First Cities, The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus.

More from Antiquities

View All
View All