A MONUMENTAL PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER FIVE-LIGHT CANDELABRA
A MONUMENTAL PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER FIVE-LIGHT CANDELABRA
1 More
VAT rate of 20% is payable on hammer price and buy… Read more
A MONUMENTAL PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER FIVE-LIGHT CANDELABRA

MARK OF PAUL STORR, LONDON, 1826

Details
A MONUMENTAL PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER FIVE-LIGHT CANDELABRA
MARK OF PAUL STORR, LONDON, 1826
Each on shaped circular base, cast and chased with flowers and scrolls on a matted ground, the stem cast with lion's masks and further foliate scrolls, each with detachable branches with four coral-cast brackets terminating in shell-cast spool-shaped socket with detachable nozzle, the central socket with detachable flammiform finial, marked on base, branches, sockets, nozzles and finials, further engraved underneath with scratch weight 'Oz323.10' and 'Oz338'
26. 3/8 in. (67 cm.) high
656 oz. 4 dwt. (20,408 gr.)
Provenance
Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, New York, 17 June 1981, lot 84.
Special notice

VAT rate of 20% is payable on hammer price and buyer's premium

Brought to you by

Giles Forster
Giles Forster

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay


These monumental candelabra are very fine examples of the Rococo Revival style mastered by Paul Storr. The Rococo style which originated in Paris in the 1730s was inspired by natural forms and characterised by asymetrical silhouettes abd naturalistic ornaments consisting of shells and flowers. The style spread rapidly across Europe, and interest in it was revived in England in the early nineteenth century, when leading silversmiths of the day created works derived from the George II rococo style. A notable comparison can be drawn between the present candelabra and a six-branch candelabrum by Storr dated of 1835 with very similar branches, illustrated in N. M. Penzer, Paul Storr The Last of the Goldsmiths, London, 1954, p. 232-3, pl. LXXVII.

Storr worked at the beginning of his career in partnership with Rundell, Bridge and Rundell with whom he created magnificent objects for some of the most important collections of the day, including the Royal Collection. After dissolving his partnership with that firm, Storr worked independently for patrons including the Crown and Lord Spencer, creating pieces in a largely neo-classical style inspired by the antique. His rococo work is rarer and is distinguished here by the elegant proportions and the fine chasing of the candelabra.

More from The Collector: Silver and 19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Ceramics & Works of Art

View All
View All