A MUGHAL SPINEL BEAD PENDANT
On lots marked with an + in the catalogue, VAT wil… Read more The Property of a Royal Family
A MUGHAL SPINEL BEAD PENDANT

Details
A MUGHAL SPINEL BEAD PENDANT
The spinel bead, weighing approximately 128.10 carats, engraved 'Jahangir Shah Akbar Shah', dated 'AH 1018/1609-10 AD', and 'Shah Jahan, Jahangir Shah', dated 'AH 1049/1639-40 AD', to the fabric torsade necklace
Accompanied by report 81037 dated 29 June 2015 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the origin of the spinel is Tajikistan, with no indications of heating, and an Appendix letter stating that 'A natural spinel from Tajikistan of this exceptional size and quality is very rare and exceptional. Together with the historical context of such spinels, this jewel can be considered a true treasure of nature'.
Special notice

On lots marked with an + in the catalogue, VAT will be charged at 8% on both the premium as well as the hammer price.
Post lot text
In Indian imperial miniatures such as in the Windsor Padhahnama, which documents the reign of Shah Jahan (1628-1658), pearls and spinels tended to be worn by the ruler and his most intimate circle. Many of these stones were inscribed with the names of Mughal emperors, some bearing personalized inscriptions in the names of Jahangir, his son Shah Jahan or later owners. It is known that Jahangir was a great connoisseur of gems. He was described by a contemporary English visitor, the Rev. Edward Terry, as ‘the greatest and richest master of precious stones that inhabits the whole Earth’. His passion for gems was continued by his son, Shah Jahan.
The habit of inscribing objects and gems in order to personalize them was a Timurid fashion. The Timurids were founded by Timur (Tamerlane), they ruled over Afghanistan, large parts of Iran and Central Asia, from the late 14th to the late 15th centuries. It was to the Timurids that the Mughals ultimately owed many debts in the development of their particular imperial style. A very large red spinel, known as the Timor Ruby, now in the British Crown Jewels, was once in the possession of Jahangir. The stone was presumably once inscribed with Tamerlane’s name and thus may have set a precedent for the habit of inscribing precious stones. Several objects made of semi-precious stones and inscribed with his name are known. In the case of gemstones, every new royal owner had his own inscription added as a mark of ownership, often having the old eradicated.

More from Geneva Magnificent Jewels

View All
View All