A NORTH WEST PERSIAN CARPET
A NORTH WEST PERSIAN CARPET
A NORTH WEST PERSIAN CARPET
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A NORTH WEST PERSIAN CARPET
5 More
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE CANADIAN COLLECTOR
A NORTH WEST PERSIAN CARPET

SECOND HALF 18TH CENTURY

Details
A NORTH WEST PERSIAN CARPET
SECOND HALF 18TH CENTURY
Extensive areas of wear and corrosion with associated repiling and tinting, last few rows at each rewoven
11ft.3in. x 5ft.5in. (342cm. x 165cm.)
Provenance
Anon sale, Christie's London, 24 April 1997, lot 453, from where purchased by present owner
Further details
Some countries prohibit or restrict the purchase and/or import of Iranian-origin property. Bidders must familiarise themselves with any laws or shipping restrictions that apply to them before bidding on these lots. For example, the USA prohibits dealings in and import of Iranian-origin “works of conventional craftsmanship” (such as carpets, textiles, decorative objects, and scientific instruments) without an appropriate licence. Christie’s has a general OFAC licence which, subject to compliance with certain conditions, would enable a buyer to import this type of lot into the USA. If you intend to use Christie’s licence, please contact us for further information before you bid.

Brought to you by

Emilie Frontera
Emilie Frontera Senior Sale Coordinator

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Lot Essay


The field design on the present lot derives originally from the tree carpets woven in south east Persia in the 'vase' technique. As with many other examples from this group, later versions were woven in north west Persia. The immediate north west Persian prototype of the present rug was previously part of the collection of the Berlin Museum but which was lost in 1945 (K. Erdmann, Seven Hundred Years of Oriental Carpets, London, 1970, fig 176, p.140). The drawing on the Berlin carpet was more curvilinear with slightly less stylisation of the design. It also had a red ground. A fragmentary carpet with an identical field design to the present carpet, on an indigo ground, was in the Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Vienna, but was sadly destroyed in the Second World War (F. Sarre and H. Trenkwald, Alt-Orientalische Teppiche, Vienna and Leipzig, 1926, vol.1, pl.43).

From its border design the present rug might have been thought to have been woven in the Caucasus. The structure however, with both cotton warps and wefts, confirms a north west Persian origin. The structure is indeed similar to that of the garden carpets from the same region which include the design of the present carpet in their borders. The group is discussed by Christine Klose, 'Betrachtungen zu Nordwestpersischen Gartenteppichen des 18. Jahrhunderts', HALI, vol.1, no.2, 1978, pp.112-121, and by Kurt Erdmann (op. cit., pp.66-70).

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