Home page

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A PAIR OF GEORGE III SILVER ENTREE DISHES AND COVERS
THE PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN COLLECTOR
A PAIR OF GEORGE III SILVER ENTREE DISHES AND COVERS

MARK OF JOHN PARKER AND EWDARD WAKELIN, LONDON, 1764

Details
A PAIR OF GEORGE III SILVER ENTREE DISHES AND COVERS
MARK OF JOHN PARKER AND EWDARD WAKELIN, LONDON, 1764
Each circular, on three ball feet, with two ring handles, the cover with reeded border and detachable broccoli finial, engraved on body and cover with a coat-of-arms beneath a coronet, marked underneath and on bezels, each engraved with numbers and scratch weights 'No 1 47=17' and 'No 2 43=9'
8 1/8 in. (21 cm.) diam.
91 oz. 4 dwt. (2,837 gr.)
The arms are those of Martinho de Melo e Castro (1716-1795).
Provenance
Martinho de Melo e Castro (1716-1795), then
By descent to the Melo e Castro de Vilhena.

Brought to you by

Giles Forster
Giles Forster

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Born in Lisbon, Martinho was the younger son of Francisco de Melo e Castro (1702-c.1765), Governor of Mazagão in North Africa, and Dona Maria Joaquina Xavier da Silva (1698-c.1760). Initially he followed an ecclesiastical career studying at Évora and Coimbra before serving from 1753 to 1755 as envoy to the Netherlands. In 1756 he was transferred to London to hold the post of envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary until 1762. Later that year, he traveled to France, where he represented Portugal as minister plenipotentiary at the peace talks at Fontainebleau in 1762 and Paris in 1763 which ended the Seven Years' War (1756–1763). Following the signing of the treaties, Melo e Castro briefly visited Portugal before returning to England, where he continued to serve as envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary until 1770. On 4 January 1770, he was named secretary of state for naval and overseas affairs, a post he held until his death in 1795.
Described by Jacome Ratton, the French-born but naturalized Portuguese merchant, industrialist, memoirist, and contemporary of Melo e Castro, as honest, though very stubborn and pro-English, these entree-dishes are stylistically French and were probably made to be used during his time in Paris. These entree-dishes would have accompanied the pair of tureens by Thomas Germain dated 1726-1729 with wild boar handles, also engraved with the Melo e Castro arms and now in the Getty Museum, Malibu.

More from The Collector: Silver and 19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Ceramics & Works of Art

View All
View All