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A PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER ENTRÉE DISHES, COVERS AND HANDLES
No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VA… Read more THE PROPERTY OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE K.A.J. FENWICK RE-SETTLEMENT TRUST (lots 79-82)
A PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER ENTRÉE DISHES, COVERS AND HANDLES

MARK OF S.C. YOUNGE AND CO., SHEFFIELD, 1820

Details
A PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER ENTRÉE DISHES, COVERS AND HANDLES
MARK OF S.C. YOUNGE AND CO., SHEFFIELD, 1820
Oblong and with a shell and foliage heightened gadrooned rim, the covers engraved twice with a coat-of-arms, with a detachable lion rampant crest handles, marked on sides and finials
12 in. (30.2 cm.) long
125 oz. (3,890 gr.)
The arms are those of Phillipps impaling Molyneux, quartering Dowdall, for Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872), later created 1st Baronet in 1821 and his wife Harriet (d.1832), daughter of Lieutenant General Sir Thomas Molyneux (d. 1841), whom he married in 1819. (2)
Provenance
Sir Thomas Phillipps 1st Bt. (1792-1872) and then by descent to his youngest daughter
Katherine (1829-1913), who married Rev. John Edward Addison Fenwick (1824-1903), and then by descent.
Special Notice

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Lot Essay

Sir Thomas Phillips (1792-1872) was one of the greatest manuscript and book collectors of the 19th Century. His passion for collecting started while at Rugby School, which he entered in 1807. He was the natural son of Thomas Phillips (1742-1818), a wealthy Manchester calico manufacturer. While at University College, Oxford the rate of his collecting caused his father to complain of his son's extravagance. However, after his father's death he was able to indulge his passion to the full. With the secularization of many religious houses in France and Germany he was able to buy manuscripts and printed books of great rarity. He bought from book sellers across Europe and at the many rare books auction held in the London amassing over 60,000 manuscripts. Although he entered into negotiations at different times with the Bodleian Library, the British Museum and the Phillips family of Picton Castle, his collection remained at Thirlestaine House, Cheltenham, when he died in 1872. The collection was dispersed through a series of private and auction sales from 1885.

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