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A PAIR OF HUANGHUALI HORSESHOEBACK ARMCHAIRS, QUANYI
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
A PAIR OF HUANGHUALI HORSESHOEBACK ARMCHAIRS, QUANYI

QING DYNASTY, 17TH-18TH CENTURY

Details
A PAIR OF HUANGHUALI HORSESHOEBACK ARMCHAIRS, QUANYI
QING DYNASTY, 17TH-18TH CENTURY
Each with sweeping crest rail terminates in out-swept hooks above shaped spandrels, and forms an elegant curve above the S-shaped splat carved with a ruyi-head roundel enclosing confronted chilong dragons and flanked by shaped spandrels. The rear posts continue to form the back legs below the rectangular frame above shaped, beaded aprons and spandrels carved in the front with a stylised scroll. The legs are joined by stepped stretchers and a foot rest above a shaped apron.
38 ½ in. (98 cm.) high, 27 in. (68.6 cm.) wide, 18 in. (46 cm.) deep (2)
Provenance
Christie's, New York, 2 June 1994, lot 203.
Christie's New York, 21 September 2000, lot 26
The Heveningham Hall Collection
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory, tortoiseshell and crocodile. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Brought to you by

Marco Almeida (安偉達)
Marco Almeida (安偉達) Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

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Lot Essay

Horseshoe-back armchairs of this type are among the most sought after forms and are found in public and private collections. The major distinguishing feature, other than the form of these chairs, is the decorative carving found on the back splat and the apron. For discussions of this elegant form and decorative motifs of this type of chairs, see R.H. Ellsworth, Chinese Furniture: Hardwood Examples of the Ming and Early Ching Dynasty, New York, 1971, pp. 86-87, and Wang Shixiang, Connoisseurship of Chinese Furniture: Ming and Early Qing Dynasties, Hong Kong, 1990, pp. 43-45.

One of the most notable features is the beautifully grained back splat on each of the present armchairs. Examples of huanghuali armchairs of this popular form carved with ruyi heads on the back splat, include a pair illustrated by Wang Shixiang and Curtis Evarts in Masterpieces from the Museum of Classical Chinese Furniture, Chicago and San Francisco, 1995, p. 56, no. 26, and later sold at Christie’s New York, 19 September 1996, lot 99; and a single huanghuali horseshoeback armchair, illustrated by R.H. Ellsworth in Chinese Furniture: One Hundred Examples from the Mimi and Raymond Hung Collection, New York, 1996, pp. 68-69, no. 14, where it was dated to the late Ming dynasty, 17th century.

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