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A PAIR OF ITALIAN ORMOLU CANDLESTICKS after designs by Piranesi, each with flaming nozzle above a gadrooned urn with everted, moulded rim, the turned spreading shaft decorated with trailing foliage and birds and supported by triple scrolled cranes resting upon swagged ram's heads, upon a spreading, canted triangular plinth decorated with scrolled acanthus and resting upon three winged lions, upon a further eared triangular panelled plinth and black moulded slate base

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A PAIR OF ITALIAN ORMOLU CANDLESTICKS after designs by Piranesi, each with flaming nozzle above a gadrooned urn with everted, moulded rim, the turned spreading shaft decorated with trailing foliage and birds and supported by triple scrolled cranes resting upon swagged ram's heads, upon a spreading, canted triangular plinth decorated with scrolled acanthus and resting upon three winged lions, upon a further eared triangular panelled plinth and black moulded slate base
16in. (40.25cm.)high (2)

Lot Essay

Designed in the 'antique' manner popularised by G.B.Piranesi in his 'Vasi, Candelabri, Cippi', the prototype for these candlesticks is the Farnese tripod published in R. Gargiulo, 'Racolta de Munimenti Pui Inttersant Del RI Museo Borbonico', (sic) 1825, pl.39, 40A. Like the related Newdigate candelabrum, found in Hadrian's Villa, Tivoli, by Gavin Hamilton in 1769 and consequently acquired by Sir Roger Newdigate in 1775 from Piranesi, the Farnese candelabrum was a highly prized and celebrated antiquity, moved from the Farnese collection to Naples by Charles III, king of Naples 1734-59 and king of Spain 1759-1788. Now in the Museo Nazionale, the model was popularized by founders such as Jacopo Chiurazzi & Sons of Naples, in whose catalogue of circa 1900 it appears ('N.325 candelabre Farnèse'). Chiurazzi are known to have employed R. Gargiulo's work (op. cit.) as a pattern-book in (cf. These Rooms, lot 182, 4 June 1992). The addition of the flaming finials as nozzles displays similarities with Thomas Hope's design for candelabrum in his 'Household Furniture and Interior Decoration', London 1807
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