Browse Lots

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A PAIR OF LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND BRONZE HORSE PRESSE-PAPIERS
VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 2… Read more
A PAIR OF LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND BRONZE HORSE PRESSE-PAPIERS

CIRCA 1745, THE BRONZE HORSES AFTER A MODEL ATTRIBUTED TO FRANCESCO FANELLI

Details
A PAIR OF LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND BRONZE HORSE PRESSE-PAPIERS
CIRCA 1745, THE BRONZE HORSES AFTER A MODEL ATTRIBUTED TO FRANCESCO FANELLI
Each with a galloping horse, supported upon a naturalistically-modelled tree stump, on an asymmetrical channelled C-scroll and rocaille spreading plinth, the plinths probably mid-18th Century aftercasts with resultant indistinct C couronné poinçons
8¼ in. (21 cm.) high; 9¼ in. (23.5 cm.) wide (2)
Provenance
Probably Nicolas Beaujon, Banquier de la Cour, recorded in his hôtel particulier (now the Palais de l'Elysée) in January 1787 and probably sold in his sale in Paris, 25 April 1787 and the following days.
The René Fribourg Collection, 11 East 84th Street, New York; sold Sotheby's London, 28 June 1963, lot 160 (£9,200 to Cavendish).
Magnificent French Furniture Formerly from the Collection of Monsieur and Madame Riahi; sold Christie's New York, 2 November 2000, lot 9.
The Greenberg Collection.
Literature
The Ivory Hammer, The Year at Sotheby's, 1962-1963 Season, p. 226.
Special Notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.

Brought to you by

Jamie Collingridge
Jamie Collingridge Clocks

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

The C-couronné poinçon was a tax mark applied to alloys containing copper between March 1745 and February 1749.

Mains à papiers or presse-papiers of this type are described in the Inventory taken following the death of the banker Nicolas Beaujon in January 1787. Placed upon a Louis XV lacquer bureau plat in the grand salon on the first floor of his Parisian hôtel, now the Elysée Palace, they were listed as:
Deux petits chevaux de bronze en mains à papiers sur soc [i.e. socle] de cuivre doré...
These were probably sold in the sale that followed, which began on 25 April 1787.

FRANCESCO FANELLI
These galloping horses are almost certainly inspired by the model executed by Francesco Fanelli. A Florentine sculptor, Fanelli worked in Genoa from 1609-10, before moving to England, where he was patronised by both Henry, Prince of Wales and his brother Charles I. In 1642, Fanelli left England for Paris, where he died in 1668.

Although Fanelli's oeuvre is scantly documented, his only signed work being the bust of Charles II as Prince of Wales at Welbeck Abbey, dated 1640, he appears to have specialised in small-scale, darkly patinated bronzes, primarily of equestrian subjects (J. Pope-Hennessy, Essays on Italian Sculpture, London, 1968, pp. 166-171). A closely related galloping horse features in the Cupid on horseback group recorded by Vertue amongst the sculptures by Fanelli at Welbeck Abbey in 1736, as well in the Cabinet Room at Whitehall Palace as described by van der Doort. Casts of this latter model are now in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, and were sold anonymously at Christie's London, 10 December 1991, lot 98; whilst a further variant surmounted by St. George and the Dragon was sold anonymously at Sotheby's New York, 10 January 1995, lot 64. Interestingly, this latter group is thought to have been based on a painting by Raphael now in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, which was sold from the collection of Charles I during the Civil War.

More from CHEFS-D'OEUVRE ANCIENNE COLLECTION DE MONSIEUR ET MADAME RIAHI

View All
View All