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A PART-SILK SALOR MAIN CARPET
A PART-SILK SALOR MAIN CARPET
A PART-SILK SALOR MAIN CARPET
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A PART-SILK SALOR MAIN CARPET
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Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more VARIOUS PROPERTIES
A PART-SILK SALOR MAIN CARPET

WEST TURKMENISTAN, CIRCA 1800

Details
A PART-SILK SALOR MAIN CARPET
WEST TURKMENISTAN, CIRCA 1800
With six columns of twelve guls, uneven wear, natural corrosion to silk, scattered repairs
10ft.6in. x 8ft.10in. (322cm. x 270cm.)
Special Notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square ( ¦ ) not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.

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Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam
Behnaz Atighi Moghaddam Head of Sale

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Lot Essay

There still remains a question as to when and under what circumstances Salor main carpets were woven. However, what is clear from the surviving examples is that a strict formula was closely observed by the weavers, and clearly understood and highly respected by the recipients of such carpets (Elena Tsareva, Turkmen Carpets: The Neville Kingston Collection, 2016, p.29). The stability of the design repertoire is continued here in a display of six rows of twelve typical Salor guls interspersed with smaller octagonal motifs, within a stepped cruciform border. The magenta silk highlights in these decorative elements against the scarlet-red ground contributes to the unusual beauty of these weavings.
The luxurious wool and the technical consistency displayed by the group has led many to believe that they were woven in workshops owned by the tribe. Mackie and Thompson note that the exceptional workmanship of these carpets, along with the luxurious materials themselves, would have been costly and serve as a reminder of the great wealth of the Central Asian tribes (Turkmen: Tribal carpets and traditions, 1980, p.69). The example published by Mackie and Thompson, formerly part of the Leslie and Elisabeth Leifer collection, itself went on to achieve a world record when it was sold by the Austria Auction Company, Vienna, 16 September 2014, lot 125 (see HALI, Winter 2014, no. 182, p.153). A Salor main carpet also displaying 6 columns of twelve guls was sold at Rippon Boswell, 19 May 2012, lot 158.
Further Salor main carpets are in notable collections including one in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (acc.no. 1974.149.46), in the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (Elena Tsareva, Teppiche aus Mittelasien und Kasachstan. Leningrad, 1984, no. 3), and another published in Antique Oriental Carpets from Austrian Collections, 1986, pl. 103.
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