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A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BEEHIVE-FORM WATER POT, TAIBAI ZUN
A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BEEHIVE-FORM WATER POT, TAIBAI ZUN
A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BEEHIVE-FORM WATER POT, TAIBAI ZUN
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A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BEEHIVE-FORM WATER POT, TAIBAI ZUN

KANGXI SIX-CHARACTER MARK IN UNDERGLAZE BLUE AND OF THE PERIOD (1662-1722)

Details
A PEACHBLOOM-GLAZED BEEHIVE-FORM WATER POT, TAIBAI ZUN
KANGXI SIX-CHARACTER MARK IN UNDERGLAZE BLUE AND OF THE PERIOD (1662-1722)
The domed body is incised with three dragon roundels and covered with a glaze of soft crushed-strawberry red tone which shades to a pale greenish-beige on one side and around the neck, in contrast to the white rim.
5 in. (12.7 cm.) diam.
Provenance
Mary Stillman Harkness (1874-1952) Collection.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, accessioned in 1950.

Brought to you by

Margaret Gristina (葛曼琪)
Margaret Gristina (葛曼琪) Senior Specialist, VP, Head of Private Sales New York

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Lot Essay

Water pots of this form are known as taibai zun, after the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, who is often depicted leaning against a large wine jar of similar form. They are also known as jizhao zun because their shape resembles basketware chicken coops that are woven with small openings at the top through which the chicks are fed.

Compare the Kangxi peachbloom water pot, formerly in the collections of Emily Trevor and John B. Trevor, Jr., sold in our Hong Kong rooms, 28 May 2014, lot 3301.

For further discussion of peachbloom-glazed wares of the Kangxi period, see the note to lot 913.

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