A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED SQUARE TABLE
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED SQUARE TABLE
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED SQUARE TABLE
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED SQUARE TABLE
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Lots made of or including (regardless of the perc… Read more PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE WEST COAST COLLECTION
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED SQUARE TABLE

17TH-18TH CENTURY

Details
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTED SQUARE TABLE
17TH-18TH CENTURY
The paneled-top is set in a square frame above the plain apron. The whole is raised on square-section legs terminating in hoof feet, and joined by humpback stretchers which are flush to the apron.
33 ½ in. (85.6 cm.) high, 36 3/8 in. (92.5 cm.) square
Provenance
Grace Wu Bruce, Hong Kong, 21 May 1991.
Special notice
Lots made of or including (regardless of the percentage) endangered and other protected species of wildlife are marked with the symbol ~ in the catalogue. This material includes, among other things, ivory, tortoiseshell, crocodile skin, rhinoceros horn, whalebone certain species of coral, and Brazilian rosewood. You should check the relevant customs laws and regulations before bidding on any lot containing wildlife material if you plan to import the lot into another country. Several countries refuse to allow you to import property containing these materials, and some other countries require a licence from the relevant regulatory agencies in the countries of exportation as well as importation. In some cases, the lot can only be shipped with an independent scientific confirmation of species and/or age, and you will need to obtain these at your own cost.

Brought to you by

Vicki Paloympis (潘薇琦)
Vicki Paloympis (潘薇琦) Head of Department, VP, Specialist

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Lot Essay


For dining, writing, appreciating antiques, or playing games, the square table is one of the most versatile forms in Chinese furniture. Several variations of square table exist, including waisted and waistless examples, and those with decorative struts between the apron and stretcher. The present example with the humpback stretchers placed directly under the apron, provide added strength while lightening the overall appearance, and not interfering with the knees of the sitters. A huanghuali waistless square table with similar placement of the humpback stretchers but with legs of round section, dated to late Ming, is illustrated by Grace Wu Bruce in The Best of the Best: The MQJ Collection of Ming Furniture Vol.1, Hong Kong, 2017, pp. 98-101.

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