A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTLESS DAYBED, TA
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE NEW YORK COLLECTION 
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTLESS DAYBED, TA

LATE MING DYNASTY, 17TH CENTURY

Details
A RARE HUANGHUALI WAISTLESS DAYBED, TA
LATE MING DYNASTY, 17TH CENTURY
The soft mat seat is set within the wide rectangular frame with rounded edges, above plain stretchers supported by pairs of vertical struts set into long stretchers. The frame is supported on thick legs of rounded section.
19 11/16 in. (50 cm.) high, 73 in. (185.4 cm.) wide, 25 5/8 in. (65 cm.) deep
Provenance
Nicholas Grindley
Exhibited
N. Grindley, International Asian Art Fair, New York, 25-30 March 1999, no. 8

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Angela Kung
Angela Kung

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Lot Essay

The present daybed, with its simple and restrained lines, represents one of the most popular forms found in classical Chinese furniture design. The use of the daybed was manifold - during the day, it served as a sitting platform, and at night a bed. In Austere Luminosity of Classical Chinese Furniture, Berkeley, 2001, pp. 105-21, S. Handler discusses the origins and uses of this intriguing form. For a further discussion, see R. H. Ellsworth, Chinese Furniture Hardwood Examples of the Ming and Early Ching Dynasties, New York, 1971, pp. 90-1. Also of note are two similarly dated examples in huanghuali, illustrated by Ellsworth, pls. 37-8. A closely related huanghuali ta, dated 16th/17th century, formerly in the collection of Gangolf Geis, was sold at Christie's New York, 18 September 2003, lot 20.
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