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A RARE INSCRIBED AND DATED DING LOBED DISH
A RARE INSCRIBED AND DATED DING LOBED DISH
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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF RONALD W. LONGSDORF
A RARE INSCRIBED AND DATED DING LOBED DISH

EARLY NORTHERN SONG DYNASTY, WITH INSCRIPTION DATING TO FIRST YEAR OF TAIPINGXINGGUO REIGN, CORRESPONDING TO AD 976 AND OF THE PERIOD

Details
A RARE INSCRIBED AND DATED DING LOBED DISH
EARLY NORTHERN SONG DYNASTY, WITH INSCRIPTION DATING TO FIRST YEAR OF TAIPINGXINGGUO REIGN, CORRESPONDING TO AD 976 AND OF THE PERIOD
The dish is thinly potted with a flat base rising to five petal-lobes, applied inside and out with a clear glaze of pale ivory tone, with ‘tear marks’ on the reverse side. The flat base is unglazed, revealing the fine, white body written in black ink with a two-line poem followed by a Taipingxingguo first year, sixth day of the sixth month date, corresponding to AD 976, and a signature Liu Zhang of Jianzhou prefecture.
7 ¼ in. (18.5 cm.) diam., box
Provenance
K.Y. Fine Art, Hong Kong, 2011
Exhibited
J.J. Lally & Co. Oriental Art, Early Chinese White Wares: The Ronald W. Longsdorf Collection, New York, 11 September to 3 October 2015, cat. no. 21

Brought to you by

Marco Almeida (安偉達)
Marco Almeida (安偉達) SVP, Senior International Specialist, Head of Department

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Lot Essay

The inscription may be translated as ‘Yi Ding vessels [are white] as frosty snow [by] the light of the moon through ten thousand li of clouds. On the sixth day of sixth month of the first year of Taipingxingguo reign, written by Liu Zhang of Jianzhou prefecture.’

The characters Yi Ding inscribed on the current dish can also be found and incised on two other Ding bowls dating to the Five Dynasties, one in the Shanghai Museum, the other in the Palace Museum, illustrated in Selection of Ding Ware: the Palace Museums Collection and Archaeological Excavation, Beijing, 2012, no. 30. There has been much scholarly debate over the interpretation of these two characters, with some suggesting Yi should be read as Yang, referring to Quyang where the Ding kilns are located; some suggesting they stand for Yizhou and Dingzhou in Hebei; and some suggesting this group were made for the military governor of Yiding area (Yiding jiedushi).

Three Ding vessels excavated from the underground palace of the Jingzhisi Temple pagoda were inscribed in ink with a Taipingxingguo second year date, corresponding to 977, one year after our current dish. The first is a lobed dish incised with a guan character, illustrated in Ding Kiln of China, Beijing, 2012, p. 72, no. 60. The second is a Ding box, illustrated in Liu Tao, Dated Ceramics of the Song, Liao and Jin Periods, Beijing, 2004, p. 4, no. 1-16. The third is a Ding censer moulded with Buddhist figures, illustrated in Complete Collection of Ceramics Art Unearthed in China -3- Hebei, Beijing, 2008, no. 93.

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