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A ROMAN TERRACOTTA PORTRAIT HEAD OF POMPEY
This lot is offered without reserve.
A ROMAN TERRACOTTA PORTRAIT HEAD OF POMPEY

REPUBLICAN PERIOD, CIRCA 75-50 B.C.

Details
A ROMAN TERRACOTTA PORTRAIT HEAD OF POMPEY
REPUBLICAN PERIOD, CIRCA 75-50 B.C.
4 ¾ in. (12 cm.) high
Provenance
Hans (1900-1967) and Marie-Louise (1910-1997) Erlenmeyer, Basel, acquired by 1967; thence by bequest to the Erlenmeyer Stiftung.
Antiquities from the Erlenmeyer Collection; Sotheby's, London, 9 July 1990, lot 76.
with Ariadne Galleries, New York.
Dr. Anton Pestalozzi (1915-2007), Zurich, acquired from the above, 1998; thence by descent to the current owner.
Literature
F. Johansen, "Antike Portrætter af Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus," Meddelelser fra NY Carslberg Glyptotek: 1969-1973, 1973, p. 114, fig. 26.
F. Johansen, "Ritratti antichi di Cicerone e Pompeo Magno," Analecta Romana Instituti Danici 7, 1977, p. 66, fig. 40.
M. Bentz, "Zum Porträt des Pompeius," Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archaeologischen Instituts, Romische Abteilung 99, 1992, p. 230, no. b, pl. 65, no. 1.
K. Dahmen, Untersuchungen zu Form und Funktion kleinformatiger Porträts der römischen Kaiserzeit, Munich, 2001, p. 12, n. 83.
V.M. Strocka, "Caesar, Pompeius, Sulla: Politikerporträts der späten Republik," Freiburger Universitätsblätter 163, no. 1, 2004, pp. 62-63, fig. 32.
I. Jucker, Skulpturen der Antiken-Sammlung Ennetwies, Mainz am Rhein, 2006, Band 2, pp. 42-46, pls. 17-18.
Arachne Online Database no. 1140679.
Special Notice

This lot is offered without reserve.

Brought to you by

Hannah Fox Solomon
Hannah Fox Solomon

Lot Essay

Gnaeus Pompey Magnus (106-48 B.C.) was a Roman statesman and military leader of the late Republic who was instrumental in establishing new Roman colonies in Pontus and Syria. While he achieved success against Mithridates VI in 63 B.C. he was less successful against Julius Caesar in the Battle of Pharsalus in 48 B.C. After his defeat at Caesar's hands, Pompey sought refuge in Egypt where he was subsequently assassinated by a member of Ptolemy XII's army.

This terracotta portrait of Pompey follows a scheme found in marble sculpture of the statesman. As D.E.E. Kleiner notes (pp. 42-44 in Roman Sculpture) Pompey’s portraits do not follow standard republican traits such as a bald pate or receding hairline. Instead, Pompey’s full head of hair with an anastole recalls portraits of Alexander the Great and attests to the vision that Pompey set for himself.

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