A RUSSIAN ORMOLU-MOUNTED FRUITWOOD GUERIDON
A RUSSIAN ORMOLU-MOUNTED FRUITWOOD GUERIDON
A RUSSIAN ORMOLU-MOUNTED FRUITWOOD GUERIDON
2 More
Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s F… Read more PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF ROSA STRYGLER
A RUSSIAN ORMOLU-MOUNTED FRUITWOOD GUERIDON

CIRCA 1790

Details
A RUSSIAN ORMOLU-MOUNTED FRUITWOOD GUERIDON
CIRCA 1790
The oval hinged galleried top opening to a fitted interior with mirror, above a frieze with grisaille-decorated medallions behind glass, joined by ribboned garlands, raised on four fluted square tapering legs joined by x-form stretcher with ormolu basket, ending in leaf tip sabots
32 ½ in. (82.5 cm.) high, 18 ¾ in. (47.6 cm.) diameter
Provenance
Henry II Ford (1917-1987).
Acquired from A La Vielle Russie, New York.
Special notice

Please note this lot will be moved to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services (CFASS in Red Hook, Brooklyn) at 5pm on the last day of the sale. Lots may not be collected during the day of their move to Christie’s Fine Art Storage Services. Please consult the Lot Collection Notice for collection information. This sheet is available from the Bidder Registration staff, Purchaser Payments or the Packing Desk and will be sent with your invoice.

Brought to you by

The Collector
The Collector

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

This jewel-like table, with its delicately garlanded frieze with the rare feature of grisaille-decorated medallions, reflects the distinctive neo-classical furniture and bronzes d’ameublement being produced in St. Petersburg in the 1780s and 1790s. The grisaille medallions echoes the use of verre eglomisé ornament on pieces supplied by the German-born cabinet-maker Heinrich Gambs to the Imperial court (for instance a centre table and longcase clock at Pavlovsk, both inset with verre eglomise plaques, illustrated in A. Chenevière, Russian Furniture The Golden Age 1780—1840, New York, 1988, figs. 80 and 82). The distinctively upturned stretcher also features on other related tables produced in St. Petersburg at this time, for instance an oval table formerly in the collection of Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, illustrated Chenevière op. cit., p. 97, fig. 78 and a cut steel table produced in the Tula workshops with similarly garlanded frieze, now in the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg (illustrated in La France et la Russie au Siècles des Lumières, exh. cat., Grand Palais, Paris, 1986, p. 310).

More from The Collector: Property from Four American Collections

View All
View All