Overview

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A SET OF FOUR CHINESE EXPORT PADOUK PAGODA OPEN ARMCHAIRS
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A SET OF FOUR CHINESE EXPORT PADOUK PAGODA OPEN ARMCHAIRS

CIRCA 1775, IN THE CHINESE CHIPPENDALE MANNER

Details
A SET OF FOUR CHINESE EXPORT PADOUK PAGODA OPEN ARMCHAIRS
CIRCA 1775, IN THE CHINESE CHIPPENDALE MANNER
Each with a pagoda roof top-rail above pierced paling back and arms, with drop-in caned seats on square chamfered square legs joined by stretchers, on castors, each with a paper label inscribed 'D.H.M. 63' and the seat-rails painted with Chinese script, one chair stamped with the three Murray stars (mullets), one chair with two spandrel brackets replaced and two missing and a replaced mahogany seat, one chair with three spandrel brackets replaced, three mahogany stretchers and repairs to one arm, one chair with five spandrel brackets missing, one chair with two replaced and four missing spandrel brackets, stretchers in mahogany, losses to the paling throughout, minor differences (4)
Provenance
Almost certainly Kenwood House, London.
Removed to Scone Palace prior to the auction at Kenwood in 1922.
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.

Lot Essay

George II's reign witnessed the proliferation of such railed and pagoda-crested chairs in both the 'picturesque' Chinese tea pavilions of the landscaped parks as well as in fashionable bedroom apartments hung in Chinese flowered papers (see W. and J. Halfpenny, Rural Architecture in the Chinese Taste, 1751-2). The single armchair pattern, with plain central lozenged compartment, relates to one of Thomas Chippendale's 1750s 'Chinese Chair' patterns 'proper for lady's Dressing Rooms', which he hoped would 'improve that Taste, or Manner of work, it never having yet arrived to any Perfection' (T. Chippendale The Gentleman and Cabinet-Makers Director, 1754 (pl. 24- right side). Four armchairs of the present pattern are displayed in a Chinese-papered apartment at Saltram, Devon (C. Johnson, Saltram, 2005, pp.35 and 36).

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