A set of four George II silver candlesticks
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A set of four George II silver candlesticks

MARK OF JAMES SHRUDER, LONDON, 1743

Details
A set of four George II silver candlesticks
Mark of James Shruder, London, 1743
Each baluster form on shaped square base and on four shell, foliate scroll and cartouche bracket feet, cast and chased overall with foliage, rocaille, shells, grotesque masks and vacant cartouches, the vase-shaped socket partly-fluted with rocaille fluting and moulded rim, the detachable nozzle asymmetrical with rocaille texture to the underside, each marked on base and nozzle
9¾in. (24.5cm.) high
147oz. (4,592gr.) (4)
Provenance
Possibly anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 27 February 1957, lot 155
Literature
The Glory of the Goldsmith, Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection, London, 1989, no.85, p.120
Exhibited
London, Christie's, The Glory of the Goldsmith, Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection, 1989, no.85
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis

Lot Essay

James Shruder's first mark was entered as largeworker, 1 Wardour Street, St Ann's Westminster, on 1 August 1737. His second and third marks were entered in Greek Street, Soho as working at the Golden Ewer in Spur Street, Leicester Square; other addresses at Leicester Square are also noted. There is no record of his apprenticeship or freedom but the best of his work indicates perhaps a German origin or training in its muscular and finely designed and wrought rococo plate. His choices as a designer are evidenced in a highly original trade card engraved by J. Warburton, no less than in the unusual asymmetrical nozzles in the present set of candlesticks. Certainly he was well versed in current international design; the pattern for these candlesticks is ultimately derived from Juste-Aurele Meissonnier, Livre de Chandeliers de Sculpture en Argent, engraved by Huquier, circa 1737.

Assuming that the candlesticks sold Christie's, London, in 1957 referenced above are the same as the present set, they had at that time extended plain sockets which increased their height by about an inch; these have since been removed to no detriment to the overall balance and form. Shruder's reputation at his height was as one of the finest plateworkers of his day; nevertheless he is recorded in 1749 as bankrupt at St Martin's in the Fields (The Gentleman's Magazine, p.285).
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