Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
A SET OF TEN GEORGE III MAHOGANY DINING CHAIRS
A SET OF TEN GEORGE III MAHOGANY DINING CHAIRS
A SET OF TEN GEORGE III MAHOGANY DINING CHAIRS
1 More
A SET OF TEN GEORGE III MAHOGANY DINING CHAIRS
4 More
This Lot is transferred to Christie’s Redstone Pos… Read more
A SET OF TEN GEORGE III MAHOGANY DINING CHAIRS

CIRCA 1760

Details
A SET OF TEN GEORGE III MAHOGANY DINING CHAIRS
CIRCA 1760
Comprising two armchairs and eight side chairs, each with foliate-carved and ribbon cresting, over a pierced splat, on blind fret-carved legs, upholstered in close-nailed brown leather, most with inventory label inscribed D.R. 53.1945
Provenance
Arthur S. Vernay, Inc., New York, acquired by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 1955.
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 1955-1960, 740 Park Avenue.
Martha Baird Rockefeller 1960-1971, 740 Park Avenue.
The Estate of Martha Baird Rockefeller, acquired June 1971.
Literature
D. Fennimore et al., The David and Peggy Rockefeller Collection: Decorative Arts, New York, 1992, vol. IV, p. 285, no. 292.
Special Notice

This Lot is transferred to Christie’s Redstone Post-Sale Facility in Long Island City after 5.00 pm on the last day of the sale. They will be available at Redstone on the following Monday. Property may be transferred at Christie’s discretion following the sale and we advise that you contact Purchaser Payments on +1 212 636 2495 to confirm your property’s location at any given time.
On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial interest in the outcome of the sale of certain lots consigned for sale. This will usually be where it has guaranteed to the Seller that whatever the outcome of the auction, the Seller will receive a minimum sale price for the work. This is known as a minimum price guarantee. This is a lot where Christie’s holds a direct financial guarantee interest.

Brought to you by

General Enquiries
General Enquiries

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

This set of ten chairs, together with six similar, though not identical ones (No. 293), were purchased by my parents from Arthur Vernay for their dining room at 740 Park Avenue. When the furnishings from 740 Park Avenue were to be distributed to my siblings and me in 1971 after my stepmother, Martha, died, we asked Stephen Jussel to look at the items in the apartment and give us his judgment of which ones were especially good. He pointed out in particular this set of dining-room chairs, which he thought were quite outstanding. Fortunately for us, we were able to acquire them in the draw. They have served us very well in our dining room at 65th Street ever since.
D. R.

These chairs were likely inspired by the designs of Thomas Chippendale, the most influential cabinet-maker of the 18th century. The third edition of Chippendale’s pattern book for furniture design, The Gentleman & Cabinet-Maker’s Director, 1762, includes illustrations for chair backs with related pierced gothic arches (plate XVII), and similar blind fret-carved legs (plate XXVII).
Additional patterns for chairs uniting classical and gothic elements were published by Robert Manwaring in The Cabinet and Chair-maker’s Real Friend and Companion, 1765, and The Chair-Maker’s Guide, 1766 as well as in his contribution to A Society of Upholsterers, Genteel Household Furniture in the Present Taste, circa 1765 (E. White, Pictorial Dictionary of British 18th Century Furniture Design, Woodbridge, 1990, pp. 69, 72-74, and 77-81). Other features, such as the use of bold nailing patterns, are featured in Thomas Malton’s Compleat Treatise on Perspective, 1775 (E. White, op. cit., p. 85).
A set of six dining chairs with similar pierced backs, probably from the collection of the Meade Waldo family of Hever Castle, Kent, sold Christie’s, New York, 7-8 February 2017, lot 10.

More from The Collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller: English & European Furniture, Ceramics and Decorations, Part I

View All
View All