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A SUITE OF LOUIS XVI WHITE-PAINTED AND PARCEL-GILT SEAT FURNITURE
A SUITE OF LOUIS XVI WHITE-PAINTED AND PARCEL-GILT SEAT FURNITURE

BY GEORGES JACOB, CIRCA 1785

Details
A SUITE OF LOUIS XVI WHITE-PAINTED AND PARCEL-GILT SEAT FURNITURE BY GEORGES JACOB, CIRCA 1785 Comprising six fauteuils and a canape, each with châpeau-de-gendarme back, the frames all carved with rope-twist, piastre, leaf-tip and fluting, on foliate-headed tapering legs, covered in pale blue silk damask, five fauteuils stamped G. IACOB to underside front seatrail (three indistinctly), one replaced front rail with spurious stamp G. JACOB , one with paper label inscribed in ink No. 1116 and Avis aug 140, four with St. Cloud inventory numbers stencilled to underside rear rails in black paint 9468 and 2028, the canape stamped to the underside three times CHATEAU DE SAINT CLOUD and with various black stencilled inventory numbers SC19641, SC4574, SC6339, SC2028, SC9468, minor variations to carving, construction and proportions 74¾ in. (190 cm.) long, the canape (7)
Provenance
The Château de Saint Cloud, probably supplied in the Empire or Restauration period.
Anonymous sale; Christie's Monaco, 1 July 1995, lot 134 (acquired after the sale).

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Lot Essay

Georges Jacob, maître in 1765.

None of the marks on this suite date from the Louis XVI inventories at Saint Cloud, leading to the probable conclusion that they refer to inventories in the Empire or Restauration period when Napoleon and Louis Philippe embarked on extensive refurbishments of the Château using Louis XVI furniture.

The Château de Saint Cloud, the country house of the Gondi family, was bought in 1658 by Philippe d'Orleans, Louis XIV's brother. He appointed the architect Jules Hardoin Mansart who built one of the most beautiful palaces on the outskirts of Paris. The magnificent park with its much admired fountains was designed by Lenotre. Throughout the 18th century it remained the principal country residence of the Orleans family until it was bought in 1785 by Marie-Antoinette. It later became one of Napoleon's favorite residences and was the site of many important state events until its destruction in 1870.

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