A VERY RARE AND IMPORTANT PAINTED CIZHOU 'FISH' TRUNCATED MEIPING
A VERY RARE AND IMPORTANT PAINTED CIZHOU 'FISH' TRUNCATED MEIPING
A VERY RARE AND IMPORTANT PAINTED CIZHOU 'FISH' TRUNCATED MEIPING
2 More
A VERY RARE AND IMPORTANT PAINTED CIZHOU 'FISH' TRUNCATED MEIPING

NORTHERN SONG-JIN DYNASTY (960-1234)

Details
A VERY RARE AND IMPORTANT PAINTED CIZHOU 'FISH' TRUNCATED MEIPING
NORTHERN SONG-JIN DYNASTY (960-1234)
The vase has a rounded, ovoid body below a slightly waisted neck that rises to a lipped rim, and is painted in brownish-black slip with fish amidst water weeds on a creamy slip ground below a band of overlapping petals on the shoulder, all under a clear glaze. The foot ring is unglazed exposing the grey body.
9 7/8 in. (25.1 cm.) high, Japanese double wood box
Provenance
The Takeji Yamada Collection, Ashiya.
Mayuyama, Tokyo.
The Ataka Collection.
Literature
Koyama Fujio, Soji, Tokyo, 1943, no. 37.
Koyama Fujio, ed., Sekai Toji Zenshu (Collection of World’s Ceramics), vol. 10: China Sung and Liao Dynasties, Tokyo, 1955, p. 231, fig. 102.
Nihon Keizai Shinbunsha, Bi no bi ten (The Beauty of Beauty Exhibition), no. 6, Tokyo, 1967.
Koyama Fujio, ed., Toki Koza (Lecture of Ceramics), vol. 6: Chugoku II So (China II Song), Tokyo, 1971, no. 50.
Nihon Keizai Shinbusha, Ataka korekushon: chugoku toji meihin ten (Masterpieces of Old Chinese Ceramics from the Ataka Collection), Tokyo, 1972, no. 23.
Hasebe Gakuji, ed., Toji Taikei (Compendium of Ceramics), vol. 39: Jishu Yo, Tokyo, 1974, no. 60.
Nihon Keizai Shinbusha, Ataka korekushohugoku toji meihin ten (Masterpieces of Old Chinese Ceramics from the Ataka Collection), Tokyo, 1975, no. 35.
Mayuyama Junkichi, Ryusen Shuho (Mayuyama, Seventy Years), Tokyo, 1976, vol. 1, no. 520.
Mikami Tsugio, Sekai Toji Zenshu (Ceramic Art of the World), vol. 13: Liao, Chin and Yüan Dynasties, Tokyo, 1981, no. 246.
Christie's, The Classic Age of Chinese Ceramics: An Exhibition of Song Treasures from the Linyushanren Collection, Hong Kong, 2012, pp. 136-137, no. 56.
Rosemary Scott, ‘Chinese Classic Wares from a Japanese Collection: Song Ceramics from the Linyushanren Collection’, Arts of Asia, March-April 2014, pp. 97-108, fig. 1.
Exhibited
Nihon Keizai Shinbunsha, Bi no bi ten (The Beauty of Beauty Exhibition), no. 6, Tokyo Nihonbashi Mitsukoshi Department Store, 29 August to 3 September 1967.
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Osaka Mitsukoshi Department Store, Ataka korekushon: chugoku toji meihin ten (Masterpieces of Old Chinese Ceramics from the Ataka Collection), Osaka, November 1972.
Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Tokyo Nihonbashi Mitsukoshi Department Store, Ataka korekushon: chugoku toji meihin ten (Masterpieces of Old Chinese Ceramics from the Ataka Collection), Tokyo, 15 September to 28 September 1975.
Christie's, The Classic Age of Chinese Ceramics: An Exhibition of Song Treasures from the Linyushanren Collection, Hong Kong, 22 to 27 November 2012; New York, 15 to 20 March 2013; London, 10 to 14 May 2013.

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

On the present meiping the Cizhou potters’ free and skillful painting style brilliantly conveys the convincing impression of the flow of the water. The lively painted decoration of fish amidst aquatic plants was likely inspired by contemporaneous paintings, such as the Northern Song handscroll, Luohua youyu tu, by Liu Ke, now in the Saint Louis Art Museum; a Southern Song album leaf attributed to Zhao Kexiong, now in The Metropolitan Museum of Art; and a 13th century handscroll, Yule tu (The Pleasures of Fishes) by Zhou Dongqing. (Fig. 1) This subject recalls a famous passage from the Daoist classic Zhuangzi, in which Zhuangzi, strolling beside a river, observed, “See how the small fish come out and dart around where they please! That’s what fish really enjoy!” His companion Huizi remarked, “You’re not a fish - how do you know what fish enjoy?” to which Zhuangzi replied, “You are not I, so how do you know I don’t know what fish enjoy?”

Cizhou truncated meiping with a fish and aquatic plant design are extremely rare. A Cizhou truncated meiping of this type, with somewhat sketchily drawn fish between two horizontal bands of water plants on its upper body, is illustrated by Gakuji Hasebe in Sekai toji zenshu, Tokyo, 1977, vol. 12, Song dynasty, p. 237, no. 247. Another truncated meiping, decorated with various flower and butterfly motifs, is in the MOA Museum of Art, Atami, and is illustrated by Yutaka Mino in Freedom of Clay and Brush through Seven Centuries in Northern China: Tz'u-chou type Wares, 960-1600 A.D., Indianapolis, 1980, p. 198-99, pl. 87, where the author illustrates two further truncated meiping, one in the Tokyo National Museum (fig. 248), and the other in the Sano Museum (fig. 249). Compare, also, a Cizhou twin-handled jar decorated with similar fish and aquatic plants motif in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, illustrated in Oriental Ceramics, The World's Great Collections, vol. 10, Tokyo, 1980, no. 29.
;

More from The Classic Age of Chinese Ceramics - The Linyushanren Collection, Part III

View All
View All