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A WELL PRESENTED SCALE WATERLINE MODEL OF H.M.S. DREADNOUGHT (1906)
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A WELL PRESENTED SCALE WATERLINE MODEL OF H.M.S. DREADNOUGHT (1906)

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A WELL PRESENTED SCALE WATERLINE MODEL OF H.M.S. DREADNOUGHT (1906)
modelled by R.A. Wilson with communication and fire control masts with yards and rigging, anchors, hawse pipes, chains, deckrails, bollards, capstans, main and secondary armament, superstructure with bridge with brass binnacle over, wing bridges, comapnionways, stayed funnels, two covered lifeboats swungout on davits, steam launches and four further lifeboats overturne don deck, coal and oil shute covers and other details. The hull with portholes, sponsen booms and armoured plating is depicted lying on her mooring in a calm green sea within wood-bound galzed display case with legend. Overall measurements -- 7¾ x 22¾in. (19.5 x 58cm.) carry box
See illustration
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No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis

Lot Essay

Built in just fourteen months to a revolutuionary design by W.H. Gard and launched at Portsmouth in 1906, Dreadnought, displacing 17,900tons, cut an impressive figure. With her 10-12in. guns (each weighing 500 tons) a free board of 28 feet, length of 527 feet and beam of 82 feet, her eight steam turbines powered by eighteen Babcock and Wilson boilers enabled Dreadnought to cruise at 17.5 knots, with a maximum speed of 21 knots. Dubbed by Admiral Fisher as The hard boiled egg who could not be beat, H.M.S. Dreadnought justly enjoyed her reputation as the most powerful ship in the world. Her combination of speed and strength made all other warships obsolete overnight, triggering an arms race between Britain and Germany that would decide the outcome of the First World War. Dreadnought herself was obsolete by the war and, apart from the ramming and sinking of U29 in 1915, played little further part. She was decommissioned in 1920 and broken up in 1921.
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