Overview

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AN ART DECO DIAMOND AND MULTI-GEM 'TUTTI-FRUTTI' BRACELET, BY CARTIER
Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating … Read more THE PROPERTY OF A LADY OF TITLE
AN ART DECO DIAMOND AND MULTI-GEM 'TUTTI-FRUTTI' BRACELET, BY CARTIER

Details
AN ART DECO DIAMOND AND MULTI-GEM 'TUTTI-FRUTTI' BRACELET, BY CARTIER
The pavé-set diamond branch with carved sapphire and emerald leaves, cabochon sapphire and emerald collets, ruby bead berries and enamel detail, 1930s, 18.0 cm, with French assay mark for platinum, in red leather Cartier case
Signed Cartier, with maker's mark for Atelier Henri Picq, nos. 02357 and HC 86003
Special Notice

Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating in Burma (Myanmar) may not be imported into the U.S. Please be advised that a purchasers inability to import any such item into the U.S. or any other country shall not constitute grounds for non-payment or cancellation of the sale. With respect to items that contain any other types of gemstones originating in Burma (e.g., sapphires), such items may be imported into the U.S., provided that the gemstones have been mounted or incorporated into jewellery outside of Burma and provided that the setting is not of a temporary nature (e.g., a string).

Lot Essay

Few jewels have captured the imagination and enthusiasm of connoisseurs and collectors alike as the tutti-frutti creations by Cartier. These pieces are a direct translation of the colourful enamel seen on the reverse of Indian jewellery, particularly that of Jaipur origin.

Jacques Cartier was to make his first trip to India in 1911. This visit had a profound effect on the jewels produced by the firm throughout the 1920s and 30s and indirectly affected the entire jewellery design field of which the House of Cartier was one of the forerunners. Cartier established a network of buying agents in India, centered in Delhi, Calcutta and Bombay, that enabled them to procure rare Indian stones, including precious gemstones engraved in leaf, blossom and berry shape. The decoration on these stones was based on the Islamic flower cult of the Moghul emperors and inspired Cartier's designers, Charles Jacqueau in Paris and Georges Grenaille in New York, to create what has become known as the 'Tutti-frutti' style: vibrant jewels full of colour and flowing naturalistic design, contrasting with the rather severe, geometric Art Deco style, mainly executed in diamonds.

As very few real 'Tutti-Frutti' jewels made their way to the contemporary period, it is a great honor to present one of the finest examples for auction.

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