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AN EGYPTIAN MUMMIFIED YOUNG ADULT NILE CROCODILE
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AN EGYPTIAN MUMMIFIED YOUNG ADULT NILE CROCODILE

PTOLEMAIC OR ROMAN, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY B.C./A.D.

Details
AN EGYPTIAN MUMMIFIED YOUNG ADULT NILE CROCODILE
PTOLEMAIC OR ROMAN, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY B.C./A.D.
Wrapped in coarse linen strips with later rope, its head reversed, with small animal bones in its stomach, with possible gold(?) amulets within the wrappings, in Victorian metal and wooden glazed display case
42 in. (107 cm.) long
Provenance
The Walter Potter collection (1835-1918).
Label on case reads: "Found at Kam On [Kom Ombo] in Egypt, circa 2000 B.C. sacred to the God Sobeh and worshipped in cities that depended on water, such as the oasis of Crocodilopolis".
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis
Sale Room Notice
This lot is sold within the Alpha Scheme. EC buyers pay 17.5 VAT on the buyer's premium. Non-EC buyers pay 17.5 VAT on hammer price and the buyer's premium.

Lot Essay

Walter Potter was a taxidermist who began his collection of taxidermy in 1861. His collection expanded to such a degree and attracted so much interest that he opened his Museum of Curiosities in Bramber, Sussex, where it grew to include minerals, antiquities and travel souvenirs. On his death the museum passed to his daughter and subsequently to his grandson. The museum was later moved to Arundel where it remained for 15 years; the contents were sold last year.

Cf. S. D'Auria et al, Mummies and Magic, The Funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1988, pp. 234-235, no. 192: "Crocodiles, which were numerous in Nile waters, were from very early times both feared for their ferocity and revered: they were associated with the [water and fertility] god Sobek, who had major cult centres [with cemeteries] in the Fayum and at Kom Ombo ... Diodorus Siculus relates that Menes, the first king of Egypt, established the city of Crocodilopolis in the Fayum after having been pursued by his own hunting dogs to Lake Moeris, where he miraculously was rescued by a crocodile, which ferried him to the other side".

A full report on the crocodile by Joyce M. Filer and computed tomography scans accompany this lot.
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