Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
AN EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT OF GURU GOBIND SINGH
AN EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT OF GURU GOBIND SINGH
1 More
AN EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT OF GURU GOBIND SINGH

PUNJAB PLAINS, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY

Details
AN EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT OF GURU GOBIND SINGH
PUNJAB PLAINS, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
Opaque pigments heightened with gold on paper, in white and gold floral margins on blue ground, with red borders within thin white rules, with added fly-leaf, the reverse Mandi royal collection stamp and old inventory inscriptions in black ink and pencil
12 5/8 x 10 1/8in. (32.2 x 25.6cm.)
Provenance
Mandi Royal Collection

Condition Report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Gobind Singh was the tenth and last nanak or Sikh preacher. He is credited with having formalised the religion. Contemporaneous to the Emperor Aurangzeb, he faced the Mughal armies and was finally assassinated in 1708 while at camp expecting a Mughal delegation sent by Aurangzeb’s successor, Bahadur Shah, to broker peace.

Portraits of gurus are idealised as opposed to realistic likenesses. Painters relied on oral tradition and existing literature, either sacred or profane, to form an iconography (Susan Stronge (ed.), The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms, London, 1999, p. 209 and pl.32, p.36, p.209). Gorbind Singh’s falcon and wrist umbrella bearer denotes power and royalty whilst a following angel holding a flywhisk, as seen in the portrait illustrated ibid 1999, pl.32, p.36, signify saintlhood.

Another equestrian portrait of Gobind Singh showing him with a flacon on his wrist and followed by an umbrella bearer sold at Christie’s, South Kensington, 23 April 2012, lot 324.

More from Arts of India

View All
View All