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AN EXTREMELY RARE IMPERIAL WHITE JADE EWER AND COVER
AN EXTREMELY RARE IMPERIAL WHITE JADE EWER AND COVER
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AN EXTREMELY RARE IMPERIAL WHITE JADE EWER AND COVER

QIANLONG INCISED YUYONG SIX-CHARACTER MARK AND OF THE PERIOD (1736-1795)

Details
AN EXTREMELY RARE IMPERIAL WHITE JADE EWER AND COVER QIANLONG INCISED YUYONG SIX-CHARACTER MARK AND OF THE PERIOD (1736-1795) An elegant elongated pear form resting on a waisted foot, the gently sloping neck descending to a rounded body, bridged on one side by a square-section scroll handle and on the other by a conforming spout, carved in high relief with two scaly dragons, their contorted sinuous bodies coiling around the spout and handle, the domed cover surmounted by a third smaller coiled dragon, the Qianlong reign mark incised to the base with an additional incised Jiaqing Yuyong six-character mark in a line above the foot, the stone of an even white tone with areas of opaque inclusions 7 3/8 in. (18.7 cm.) high
Provenance
Sir Ernest Joseph Cassel (1852-1921)
Lady Delamere
Exhibited
The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England, 1961-1998

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Aster Ng
Aster Ng

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Lot Essay

A very similar ewer of the same size and proportions, also bearing a Qianlong four-character mark but with the dragons forming the handle and spout, rather than coiling around them, was included in the Spink & Son exhibition, The Minor Arts of China, London, 1985n no. 213 and later illustrated in Jade (ed. Roger Keverne), London, 1991, p. 182, fig. 135. The representation of the dragon finial also appears to be nearly identical on both examples.

Compare the depiction of the coiled dragons with a similar treatment of a dragon around the handle of a waterpot in the Seattle Art Museum, illustrated by J. Watt, Chinese Jades from the Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, 1989, p. 98, no. 77.

The presence of both a Qianlong and a Jiaqing reign mark on the ewer suggests that it is a rare example of a piece that was used in the Imperial court during both reign periods.

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